So what if, i forgot to acclimate my fish

OGKro

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Hi,

I set up a new tank 3 days ago. Added lots of bacteria and also bacteria that permits me to add the fish straight away. So i do have an older tank which is running and i have 2 clownfish inside. As i was reading through the notice of the quick start bacteria it said to add fish after 24 hours which i did. The problem is, as i read to transfer fish after 24 hours, i completely skipped acclimatation because i'm an idiot.

Should i let the fish in the new tank, which after testing has 0 ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and matches salinity and temp.

Or should i move them back to the old tank ?
 

Cell

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I would assume your new tank is running at the same temp and salinity as the existing tank in which case no acclimation is necessary. You acclimate fish when they are going to a new tank with different temp or salinity.
 
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OGKro

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I would assume your new tank is running at the same temp and salinity as the existing tank in which case no acclimation is necessary. You acclimate fish when they are going to a new tank with different temp or salinity.
Whew alright thats good to hear. I thought i just sent my fish to die in the new tank. Temp and salinity are the same
 

lion king

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You should move those fish back, there is no such thing as an instant cycle. Everything is testing zero right now, because you have no biological function happening in that tank. As soon as those fish start to waste and you feed, you will get an ammonia spike. I doubt those fish can withstand the ammonia spike untils the biological function starts in that tank. You need to cycle that new tank.
 

i cant think

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You should move those fish back, there is no such thing as an instant cycle. Everything is testing zero right now, because you have no biological function happening in that tank. As soon as those fish start to waste and you feed, you will get an ammonia spike. I doubt those fish can withstand the ammonia spike untils the biological function starts in that tank. You need to cycle that new tank.
The bacteria added is nitrifying bacteria which once settled it helps the ammonia cycle to go faster - It won’t prevent it as you say however it will help it along at a much quicker rate. I’ve personally set up my tanks with nitrifying bacteria and I’ve yet to face an issue with it. As long as the fish added are small and low billiard fish then it is alright.
 

Reefer Matt

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Hi,

I set up a new tank 3 days ago. Added lots of bacteria and also bacteria that permits me to add the fish straight away. So i do have an older tank which is running and i have 2 clownfish inside. As i was reading through the notice of the quick start bacteria it said to add fish after 24 hours which i did. The problem is, as i read to transfer fish after 24 hours, i completely skipped acclimatation because i'm an idiot.

Should i let the fish in the new tank, which after testing has 0 ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and matches salinity and temp.

Or should i move them back to the old tank ?
Did you use live rock or dry rock for new tank? Also, acclimation depends on the species of fish, imo.
 

Nman

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If it was a tank of live rock I wouldn't be concerned but if its dry rock and all new as above said tiny feeding amounts and keep testing for ammonia if levels get high maybe water change. This is the risk muturing tanks with fish in it. Good luck
 

Cell

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Bottled starter bac has been very thoroughly vetted by R2R members both in controlled experiments and in general use. They are not all created equal, however. Still, use the correct product and there is little to no risk.

 

iReefer12

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Just move some of the rock from the old tank to the new tank, don’t move them back at this point, more stress on the fish. But definitely move some of the rock or couple of cups of sand, (that would be worthwhile anyway, to add lots of beneficial life that you’ve spent time growing in the old tank).

If you absolutely can’t add rock/sand from the old tank, then you should then consider moving them back.
 

Cell

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They don't need to be moved back. Ammonia can be monitored if there is concern.

There are 2 schools of reefers in terms of cycling these days. There is nothing wrong with traditional cycles and taking things slow. There is also nothing wrong with using the technologies and innovations available to us that have been proven to be effective.
 

Kzang

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Hi,

I set up a new tank 3 days ago. Added lots of bacteria and also bacteria that permits me to add the fish straight away. So i do have an older tank which is running and i have 2 clownfish inside. As i was reading through the notice of the quick start bacteria it said to add fish after 24 hours which i did. The problem is, as i read to transfer fish after 24 hours, i completely skipped acclimatation because i'm an idiot.

Should i let the fish in the new tank, which after testing has 0 ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and matches salinity and temp.

Or should i move them back to the old tank ?
Most fish sold are shipped in lower salinity like 1.018-1.021 because less salt means cheaper and they say lower salinity helps with fish stress and parasites. We usually run 1.024-1.026 so that’s where it comes from.
 
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OGKro

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Just so everyone knows, my ammonia test is still reading the lowest there is. So its looking alright
 

leon.1980

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The bacteria added is nitrifying bacteria which once settled it helps the ammonia cycle to go faster - It won’t prevent it as you say however it will help it along at a much quicker rate. I’ve personally set up my tanks with nitrifying bacteria and I’ve yet to face an issue with it. As long as the fish added are small and low billiard fish then it is alright.
You need to look up the effects of ammonia poisoning on fish. Just because they are alive doesn’t mean they aren’t suffering!
 

SteveMM62Reef

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I put my fish in a Specimen Container to acclimate, I’ve had them jump out and into the Aquarium, with no harm done. The fish were from a LFS with low Salinity.
 

exnisstech

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I'm using live sand and also using porous media that is filled with bacteria from my last tank
This should give it a good jump start. Are you seeing nitrate? Just curious as nitrate is mostly what I use to determine if a tank is cycled enough to begin to slowly add livestock. I haven't tested ammonia in years.
 

i cant think

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You need to look up the effects of ammonia poisoning on fish. Just because they are alive doesn’t mean they aren’t suffering!
I am aware of this, in fact I’ve seen this occur where fish have lived even after an ammonia spike. Infact, all by 2 of my fish in my nano were hit with an ammonia spike and I had one pass even after the spike occurred.

I’ve had my own fair share of experience with ammonia spikes (Both somewhat good and bad). One thing I will repeat is that as long as the fish are small, and not delicate (Like wrasses or Butterflies can be) 9/10 times they survive. Small ammonia spikes will not harm a fish, large ones however, absolutely will harm them.
 

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