Sps high nutrients myth?

Discussion in 'General SPS Discussion' started by dave57, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. FarmerTy

    FarmerTy Well-Known Member

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    Just my own personal opinion but I'd still slowly add some more fish, never shut off the skimmer (it provides a great source of dissolved oxygen too), feed heavier, and never worry about too low of phosphates. I'd keep using some type of phosphate remover... But thats really just me being paranoid about phosphate. Really, you could also just do nothing. 2-3 ppm of nitrates is not bad at all.
     
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  2. FarmerTy

    FarmerTy Well-Known Member

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    7.5 dKh, and honestly, the main reason I leave it around here instead of a higher number is because many reefers keep theirs in the 8-9 dKh range, at least in Austin they do. Maricultures come in around 6 dKh so for me, keeping it somewhere in between allows me easier acclimation for both mariculture colonies and frags from other hobbyist. My reasons have nothing to do with tank chemistry, just ease of acclimation.
     
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  3. fragit

    fragit Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    This I find interesting. So when you get frags or your maricultured colonies what is your acclimation process like. Do you drip acclimate, or put them in a holding tank with 6dkh and slowly bring up the entire water volume until it matches your DT?
     
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  4. FarmerTy

    FarmerTy Well-Known Member

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    I've never found that they needed drip acclimation. I have a pretty rigorous dipping process that involves 10 mins of Bayer, 1 hr of Interceptor, and 1 hr of a potassium dip (increasing potassium from 400 ppm to 1600 ppm with potassium chloride... Water softener pellets). While the coral goes from one treatment batch to the other, I'll slowly mix more of my DT water in each tray so by the final one, it is mostly just my DT water. I do two additional trays of just tank water as rinse stations to not bring any Bayer into the DT. I also cut off the giant mari plugs and put them on new, dried out mari plugs to avoid bringing anything in on the plugs. I also do a very careful examination of the coral flesh to look for bite marks or pests. I find having them directly under your lighting best to do this.

    Lastly, I put them right into higher par lighting, 300-400 par, as I feel they lose less color this way. Only exception being I'm pretty sure I nuked a lower light mari this way once so tread lightly on this method.
     
  5. Robthorn

    Robthorn Well-Known Member

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    .
     
  6. fragit

    fragit Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    What's the interceptor and potassium chloride for?
     
  7. FarmerTy

    FarmerTy Well-Known Member

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    Interceptor for red, gray, and black bugs and potassium as another overall "kill them all" dip, though it is pretty harsh.
     
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  8. JBNY

    JBNY Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award

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    I had been using ARM for years, then switched to Koralith that I had used in the past, and finally tried Dastaco. I had pretty much the same experience with all of them.
     
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  9. JBNY

    JBNY Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award

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    Stability I have stated for years and years is about the owner not so much the tank. You can have a rock solid stable tank in a few weeks. But most people are not disciplined enough to know how to test and correct effectively in the beginning to keep the tank stable. But it is really a matter of test and correct until you get the same reading every day, then every week, then every month.

    That is the sweet spot for SPS tanks. They almost all look great at that point. It's enough time for corals to grow and color up but not enough time for husbandry problems to start showing up. Generally, but not always, by year 3 you start seeing the same tanks start having algae and STN problems.

    It depends on your tank really. Some people can get away with just feeding more and others need to add more fish, and some people need to still dose on top of that. Mostly it is about how efficient at processing nitrates to be when you designed your tank when you set it up. I have 568 fish right now feed 12 cubes of frozen food, and 6 big pinches of pellets a day. I still have to dose KNO3 to keep nitrate in the tank.

    I have moved literally hundreds of frags in and out of my system over the years. I stopped acclimating SPS well over 10 years ago. just pull them out of the bag, leave them out for 3-5 minutes then put them in a dip, then rinse them off and put them in their holding tank. I have not lost a frag in I don't know how long. I keep my tank at 7.7 dKH but frags or colonies coming from high alk tanks I do the same and never had a problem.
     
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  10. fragit

    fragit Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    I've always just temp acclimated corals and then into the tank also. This tank everything is going to be dipped in bayer also.
     
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  11. saltyfilmfolks

    saltyfilmfolks Lights! Camera! Reef! R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Photo of the Month Award

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    Bayer doesn't kill alages.
    I believe the concentrated potassium, does.
     
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  12. fragit

    fragit Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    Correct for AWEF.
     
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  13. JBNY

    JBNY Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award

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    you don't even need to do that. Years and years ago before we knew about even red bugs, I would come back from a swap meets in the winter with frags that had been sitting in bags for hours with no heat packs, I would pull them from the bag and let them sit on the counter for about 5 minutes and pop them in the main tank. Never had a problem.
     
  14. FarmerTy

    FarmerTy Well-Known Member

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    JBNY, I'm curious what is your reasoning for the 5 minute sit out method? Wondering if it's something I need to add to my arsenal.
     
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  15. EJReef

    EJReef Well-Known Member

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    I thought bayer killed red bugs too?
     
  16. FarmerTy

    FarmerTy Well-Known Member

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    Not successfully and consistent enough to trust. Those buggers are tough.
     
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  17. JBNY

    JBNY Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award

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    it gives them enough time to get a little slime coat going before they go into the tank. The thought is that the slime helps them acclimate, fight off bad bacteria etc, when put in the water. I used to wait till they would slime up and then put them in the tank. After a while I got tried of observing them every few minutes and settled on 5 minutes. But in a rush I have put them in 2-3 minutes or so and forgotten about them and left them out for as long as 20 and they were still fine.

    If you are used to doing some kind of acclimation it takes some getting used to, but it works every time.
     
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  18. fragit

    fragit Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    Very interesting method you got there. I may have to give it a shot sometime.
     
  19. FarmerTy

    FarmerTy Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for sharing! That's definitely very interesting.

    The potassium dip I do causes them to slime up as well. I wonder if that's an added bonus right there.
     
  20. fragit

    fragit Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    Lets get this train back on track! Nutrients (nitrates and phosphates), Alk, Flow, Lighting....GO
     
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