Tank Chemistry and Nutrient Control Help Please

Discussion in 'Reef Chemistry by Randy Holmes-Farley' started by SDReefer, Dec 9, 2017.

  1. SDReefer

    SDReefer Active Member SDMA Member Build Thread Contributor

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    Hello everyone,
    My greenhouse tank has been set up since July of this year and I would like to make it into a full reef tank. However, the hardy SPS corals I have put in such as Birdsnest and Pocillipora have all STNd and many of the soft coral frags have started to melt. I assume that something is really off with my tank's reef chemistry.

    Also, I would like to know what the best method of nutrient control would be for the tank. I was thinking of doing a chaeto reactor or algae scrubber, but the problem is that there can't be any lights on during nighttime as not to bother the neighbors. Please suggest some new methods or maybe some ways to make it so that there is no light emmitted at night. Maybe I could put the reactor/algae scrubber in a box and cut holes for the input and output? Any suggestions are appreciated.

    Tank Parameters
    • Temp - 70 - 79 degrees F depending on time of day and season; no more than 5 degree swing per day
    • Salinity - 36ppm / 1.027 sg
    • Nitrate - 25 ppm (API)
    • Mg - 1140 ppm (Salifert)
    • Calcium - 500 ppm (API)
    • Alkalinity - 4.8 dKH / 1.70 meq/L (Salifert)
    • Nitrite - 0 ppm (strips)
    Please also suggest any test kits that I should upgrade to. On hand, I have ESV Alk and Calcium, as well as Kent Magnesium.

    Pictures

    The Complete Setup
    IMG_1076.jpg

    The "Display" Section
    IMG_1078.jpg

    The "Refugium" Section
    IMG_1081.jpg
     

  2. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Article Contributor Expert Contributor

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    The alkalinity is too low and that may be part of the hard coral issue. Magnesium is also low, but less likely to be the immediate problem.

    Organic carbon dosing required no light and can be a good method. Algae growth can also be done during the day.
     
  3. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Article Contributor Expert Contributor

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  4. XNavyDiver

    XNavyDiver Insightful answer loading... please wait. R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Build Thread Contributor

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    Are 5 degree temperature swings normal for your tank? Most people don't let it swing that much.
     
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