Tank upgrade: 75 or 90 gallon, with goal of keeping Tomini or Yellow Tang

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adittam

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I’m going to be upgrading my 46 gallon bowfront (see build thread for pics/videos) soon, because I desperately want to keep a tang as my centerpiece fish but won’t put a fish in a tank that it won’t thrive in.

Unfortunately, the max size footprint that I have room for is a 4 foot long tank, so I’m looking at traditional 75 or 90 gallon tanks as my two options. This will be the biggest I can go for the foreseeable future.

Current stock list:
2 occy clowns
1 bicolor blenny
1 wheelers shrimp goby (in QT)
Various snails and hermits
Planned additions:
Randall’s pistol shrimp
Red-lined wrasse
Possibly another blenny and/or smaller, peaceful wrasse.

The top centerpiece fish on my wish list is a yellow tang. Will the YT do well in a 90 if it’s the only tang in there? How about if I add a Tomini tang at the same time, for a total of 2 tangs?

If it’s just not a good idea to keep a YT in a 90, I can live with that, but then I will probably go with a 75 gallon tank instead to save a little money and keep a Tomini tang as my centerpiece fish instead.
 
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Clo

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Do the 90 if you know you're not the type to be ok with settling.
Clearly you want a yellow tang for a reason, the tomini will only satisfy you for so long. lol
 
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adittam

adittam

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Do the 90 if you know you're not the type to be ok with settling.
Clearly you want a yellow tang for a reason, the tomini will only satisfy you for so long. lol
All true, but I also am NOT going to put a yellow in a 90 if the consensus among reef keepers more experienced than me is that it will not do well.
 

Clo

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All true, but I also am NOT going to put a yellow in a 90 if the consensus among reef keepers more experienced than me is that it will not do well.
I think they usually recommend 6' length as best possible option, but people have done worse. You could always go for a smaller one and trade it out later or upgrade again. :^)
 

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Tangs need width vs height. Longer the tank, the better. 90 gallon is only taller than a 75. You'd want the 90 gallon to have less water issues. Tomini or yellow tang can be kept for probably 2-4 yrs, tomini probably a lot longer if starting from a 2inch size and may never need an upgrade. This can all be based on the individual fishes demands. 5 foot tank will keep them for many years. I don't think that's something you plan to get.

Edit: Tomini and yellow tang have a similar body shape and it's still a hit or miss to try both. They may get along for awhile, but eventually fight it out. Get the 90 if you plan to do any small tang species. It's just going to be a better deal for the fish.
 
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Is it going to be on a stand, rimless, canopy or in-wall? Reason I went for a 90 (in addition to more water) was that doing in-wall I was hiding some of the sand and the tank plastic and waterline. The extra height of the 90 helped not shrink the viewing area too much.
 
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adittam

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Is it going to be on a stand, rimless, canopy or in-wall? Reason I went for a 90 (in addition to more water) was that doing in-wall I was hiding some of the sand and the tank plastic and waterline. The extra height of the 90 helped not shrink the viewing area too much.

Traditional rimmed Aqueon tank on a stand.
 
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adittam

adittam

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If you have the room, between those thanks, I would go with a 120. 4'x2' tank. It will give you the most options and does not increase the cost of running significantly. Same pumps, lights, etc can be used as used in a 75 or 90.
Ooo, interesting idea!
 
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I used to have your same dilemma, but never ended up getting a bigger tank :( either way, 70g is barely enough for one tang, so I would recommend getting 90g or bigger, then you could even a few tangs.
 
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adittam

adittam

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I used to have your same dilemma, but never ended up getting a bigger tank :( either way, 70g is barely enough for one tang, so I would recommend getting 90g or bigger, then you could even a few tangs.

Honestly, if I could keep a yellow tang happy and healthy in a 90, I would be happy with just 1 tang.

I also find it interesting that the general guidance given for Ctenochaetus tangs’ minimum tank size is 75 gallons, and the general guidance given for yellow tangs’ minimum tank size is 100 gallons, even though (per liveaquaria.com) the maximum size for both Ctenochaetus binotatus and Zebrasoma flavescens is 8 inches.
 

albano

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A 90 would be fine for a yellow or any of the smaller tangs like purple, kole, etc.
Agreed… if possible, start with a small CB yellow and a small tomini and they’ll be fine for many years in 90g
 
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