Discussion in 'Battlecorals' started by Battlecorals, Apr 26, 2018.

!!!WILD FIRE...and the INEVITABLE AFTER BURN....

  1. Centerline

    Centerline Valuable Member R2R Supporter Partner Member 2019 Build Thread Contributor

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    If this does get turned into an article I would speak to the pest issue as well as the odd bacterial and fungal infections that are part and parcel with co-mingling heathy and stressed out wild corals in wholesaler tanks. Browned out wild SPS can be brought back around with MH and meticulous fostering but nothing can save them when, as a consumer, you dont know what you dont know. While more obvious with LPS, often SPS will suffer from odd infections or unknown pests and present symptoms that appear to be shipping stress or acclimation issues. Of course shipping stress often exacerbates the underlying issues highlighting the wisdom of purchasing healthy tank raised stock that someone else has put the time and money into bringing to market. Personally, Ill never purchase a wild SPS again.
     
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  2. Mark SF

    Mark SF Member

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    Huge amount of respect and appreciation for your craft. This hobby is unfortunately 100% based upon the cavet emptor model and it is ********. It would be great to see documented lineage and perhaps a "certified" repository/database of coral types and morphs, similar to what the cannabis industry is doing with different strains.
     
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  3. Battlecorals

    Battlecorals Aquaculturist R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor

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    This is actually a pretty excellent idea. I definitely have at my disposal the means to organize and document, individually, a single corals path from exporter, to available captive grown coral. thanks a lot for the post
     
  4. Maacc

    Maacc Well-Known Member R2R Supporter Build Thread Contributor

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    That would be enormously interesting.
     
  5. DieHardPhotog-Reefer

    DieHardPhotog-Reefer Member

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    Really appreciated @Battlecorals OP. For the sake of my newness to the hobby, would it be okay to ask what's the difference? My wife and I are only 1 year into the hobby but only 5 months with our 1st system (took a lot of time to collect all that gear and info). Questions:
    1. What's the difference between aquacultured and maricultures?
    2. What's a large "mh" term multiple staged QT? Example??
    3. What's "BC" ones reference?
    4. What's AEFW?

    Note we don't have our first coral at all... just a 90 gal display, 29 gal display refugium and a 26 gal sump and a 15 gal AIO nano so we're really asking for educational reference.
     
  6. Maacc

    Maacc Well-Known Member R2R Supporter Build Thread Contributor

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    Aquacultured corals are ones that have been fragged/grown for years and multiple "generations" in a tank as opposed to in the wild.
    Maricultured corals are typically colonies collected in the wild and grown out in the wild in semi controlled environments.
    Aquacultured corals are typically hardier and keep their colors better than maricultured, but are smaller and more expensive.
    A multiple stage qt is one where corals are dipped multiple times and kept separated in stages to catch the life cycles of different pests.
    BC is Adam's stuff that he has grown from colonies as opposed to gotten from another aquaculturist.
    AEFW- acro eating flatworms
     
  7. smokin'reefer

    smokin'reefer Valuable Member R2R Supporter

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    Your write ups always help the expectations In this hobby. I see a lot of people post along the lines of " just bought this $500 frag and hope to grow it out and sell it in 6 months and retire off the proceeds"
    A lot of your narrations on your website talk about a certain frag that you nursed for, in some cases, years to finally have something that is a marketable product.
    Thanks for Sharing and helping to keep people's expectations real. Those that take the time to read anyway.
     
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  8. Battlecorals

    Battlecorals Aquaculturist R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor

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    This was actually the topic of another write up I started a couple years ago but still never concluded unfortunately . I think i should get back to work on that one lol. With comparison pics and all sorts of good stuff like that lol. It's pretty easy for me to spot wild cut frags, but I can imagine that generally, it's not so easy for the average customer to differentiate. Captive growth tends to be physically smaller in scale to wild growth, and that's something can stand out pretty well a lot of the times. Especially in a frag pack picture. There are lots of subtle details that can become quite obvious as well once you have an idea of what your looking at and what to look for, for sure.

    As for LFS's safe to assume that just about anything they buy wholesale larger than a golfball is more than likely either wild or maricultured.
     
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  9. Battlecorals

    Battlecorals Aquaculturist R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor

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    This is so very true! and thanks a lot for the post. Many, and I mean many, of my grown out pieces were frags off wild colonies that crashed. Maybe a few generation in now though as lots of them have been fragged and backed up and backed up again. This extremely drawn out process( literally many years) certainly helps to create far more resilient and adaptive sps over time and may very well be the best argument for aquaculture. Period.
     
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