Anemone Expelling Zooxanthellae or Waste?

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nursebran

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I dont see a reason why the clowns will not host in your anemone. Ime they are just wired to do so even the tank bred ones.
Are the clowns hosting in other corals in your tank?
Sorry/ working ...
Kind of... it’s weird. It changes. It’s not like it’s described in articles, YouTube, etc. They seemed to host my very 1st coral... a Pom Pom Xenia.
But, they move around... like... Xenia a couple of weeks, GSP for few ... and, the weirdest... equipment ... they stayed on top of my gyre for the longest. I would get scared and think they were dead (from across the room.) They were way up top, just under the surface... but, happy/healthy.
I felt a little stupid, setting up my laptop with clownfish swimming/hosting video. They (surprisingly) watched it, knew something was going on. But, did they host the anemone? No, not yet.
My family thought it was hilarious... they asked, if this was like leaving a tv on, for a dog!lol
 

nursebran

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Hey everyone, so I am starting to see the aftereffects of the BTA losing all the zooxanthellae.
20210610_172555.jpg


The black widow is looking super transparent now

20210610_172605.jpg



About how long will it take for this BTA to regain its lost color?
1st ... I’m no expert and don’t claim to be... my opinions are strictly from my own experience. I read a lot, watch YouTube videos and I have some close friends that have reef tanks. Everything reefing... is all we talk about.
Anyway, there are experts on here, people who own reef/marine stores, people that have been in this hobby 20+ years. That’s not me... mine is trial and error.
here are my thoughts...
Your anemone looks nice and healthy. I see what you are saying with the color. Do you think there’s a possibility that it’s not a true black widow? No doubt, that was what it was being sold as ...
I’m not 100% sure, that mine is... other than, that’s what they called it/sold it as.
(Mine) Its a deep red... it has the web like appearance...... but, could mine be a red/rose bubble tip anemone? I guess, I can’t say I would know the difference. If you are unsure, maybe ask a pro (on here.)
About the color...
What I’ve found to be true...
it takes them a while to adjust from where they came from... mine came from a store that used a full spectrum and fluorescent lights. I use a lot of actinic light because of my coral. I had to start alternating, using some white light. Experiment with your lights. That has a lot to do with color of the nem. And, it takes time to acclimate to your lights. Your light is adequate, it just takes time. I personally, didn’t really care about the black widow type/name. My thoughts were... deep, colorful red/ opposite of white. This one should do better because of the color, I just have to keep it that way... easier said than done! Receiving/buying a healthy one, is what worked for me. I guess, my point... was to have a healthy/happy BTA. Not so much, as that specific type.
It looks happy/healthy, to me. Maybe, the red will deepen over time. As long as, it’s getting enough light. It should be fine. I like it. It looks nice and healthy, bubbly:)
 
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vetteguy53081

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Any tips for getting clownfish to host?
I didn’t know that about the black widows...
I’ve only bought from stores (online) and I found a good place in Atlanta. Georgia doesn’t have many reef stores to choose from. I’m scared of buying from individual sellers (I don’t know what I’m doing/ trying to stay safe.)
I was super excited when mine split. And, both are doing good. Yay! Something actually went right, for a change. Anyway, beautiful anemone! :)
Clowns dont host- The anemone/corals do. Some will readily invite clowns while others will take time or not at all. Clowns tend to get a little crazy with anemones and will be rejected right away or anemone will simply fold until clown goes away.
 
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vetteguy53081

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1st ... I’m no expert and don’t claim to be... my opinions are strictly from my own experience. I read a lot, watch YouTube videos and I have some close friends that have reef tanks. Everything reefing... is all we talk about.
Anyway, there are experts on here, people who own reef/marine stores, people that have been in this hobby 20+ years. That’s not me... mine is trial and error.
here are my thoughts...
Your anemone looks nice and healthy. I see what you are saying with the color. Do you think there’s a possibility that it’s not a true black widow? No doubt, that was what it was being sold as ...
I’m not 100% sure, that mine is... other than, that’s what they called it/sold it as.
(Mine) Its a deep red... it has the web like appearance...... but, could mine be a red bubble tip anemone? I guess, I can’t say I would know the difference. If you are unsure, maybe ask a pro (on here.)
About the color...
What I’ve found to be true...
it takes them a while to adjust from where they came from... mine came from a store that used a full spectrum and fluorescent lights. I use a lot of actinic light because of my coral. I had to start alternating, using some white light. Experiment with your lights. That has a lot to do with color of the nem. And, it takes time to acclimate to your lights. Your light is adequate, it just takes time. I personally, didn’t really care about the black widow type/name. My thoughts were... deep, colorful red/ opposite of white. This one should do better because of the color, I just have to keep it that way... easier said than done! Receiving/buying a healthy one, is what worked for me. I guess, my point... was to have a healthy/happy BTA. Not so much, as that specific type.
It looks happy/healthy, to me. Maybe, the red will deepen over time. As long as, it’s getting enough light. It should be fine. I like it. It looks nice and healthy, bubbly:)
They will expel occasionally which is not welcomed but often occurs when there is a lack of light and/or water flow
 

nursebran

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Clowns dont host- The anemone/corals do. Some will readily invite clowns while others will take time or not at all. Clowns tend to get a little crazy with anemones and will be rejected right away or anemone will simply fold until clown goes away.
Ok
My BTA’s refuse to host (apparently) lol
I’m still hoping... some day.
 

vetteguy53081

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Ok
My BTA’s refuse to host (apparently) lol
I’m still hoping... some day.
Try this trick- When feeding clowns, drop food into nem first. The clowns will try to go after the food. Obviosuly, they will land in the nem to do that. It may open the door for an invite/
 

nursebran

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Appears to have been taking in water. They’re fairly low maintenance and they can add a really neat look to your tank. Bubble Tip Anemone care requires you to have a strong understanding of these invertebrates if you want them to thrive. They’re not as easy to own as many people think. Thanks to the symbiotic relationship they form with certain fish, they are a joy to watch and care for. This species splits and propagates very easily in the right conditions, resulting in large captive populations.
The length of the tentacles can vary. The same goes for the size and shape of the bulb. With some specimens, the bulb is accompanied by a small tip. Interestingly enough, the tentacles can change based on the anemone’s environment. Below the splay of tentacles is the anemone’s foot. The foot is delicate. Yet, it has simple muscle fibers that help the creature move and anchor onto rocks.
Rose Bubble Tip Anemones are, by far, the most common type you’ll see on the market. They’re prolific propagators, which undoubtedly contributes to their popularity. This type is quite affordable and is a good option for first-time anemone owners. Rainbow bubble Tip Anemone that’s usually considered to be exotic. They’re rarer than standard Rose varieties and their pricing usually reflects that. The base of the Rainbow Bubble Tip Anemone is vibrant neon blue. This color gradually fades into a rose color on the tips of the tentacles.
Green Bubble Tip Anemones are fairly common. Like the Rose variety, these anemones are quite affordable and readily available in the trade.
Many new and seasoned aquarists dream of owning these invertebrates. But proper Bubble Tip Anemone care requires a bit of work to keep these creatures healthy! In short, we usually don’t recommend them for first-time aquarists. Having thorough knowledge about these animals is a must. The invertebrates are sensitive to water changes and require pristine conditions to stay in good shape. Failing to meet their needs can result in early death and damage to the tank environment as a whole. Yes, getting caught in a power head is a concern but rarely occurs. I have 6 (which time to sell a couple of them and none have ever left their spot in the tank.
The most important thing you’ll need to take care of before you bring your anemone home is perfecting the tank and water conditions. You should never place a Bubble Tip Anemone into a tank you just set up.
Take some time to get parameters just right and let the closed environment cycle for a few months. This ensures that conditions are stable and safe. Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quakity test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: Between 77°F and 82°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.4
  • Water hardness: 8 to 12 dKH
  • Specific gravity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to truly thrive because they’re photosynthetic. Basically, that means that they absorb light to make food and grow. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists agree that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your jets at the anemone. The creatures enjoy subtle movement at all times. But too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. twice a week feedings is ample.
What test kits do you recommend? I use different ones for different things. I use Salifert and Red Sea. I have a few Hanna checkers ... copper, dkh, calcium... that seem to work great. But, I hate the Hanna nitrate checker... it’s so hard and by the time you get to the final step... I don’t know if it’s right. My main ?
What’s best for checking nitrates?
 

vetteguy53081

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What test kits do you recommend? I use different ones for different things. I use Salifert and Red Sea. I have a few Hanna checkers ... copper, dkh, calcium... that seem to work great. But, I hate the Hanna nitrate checker... it’s so hard and by the time you get to the final step... I don’t know if it’s right. My main ?
What’s best for checking nitrates?
Salifert
Hanna
Nyos
 

nursebran

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Try this trick- When feeding clowns, drop food into nem first. The clowns will try to go after the food. Obviosuly, they will land in the nem to do that. It may open the door for an invite/
That makes perfect sense. I can’t believe I haven’t thought of that....
I (actually) think that might work. The clowns will take food from my hands. (They are the only ones that do that.) And, when I do water changes, they aren’t afraid. It’s almost like, they are playing and want to touch you. My tang, is completely opposite... terrified. I’ll try it tonight! It’s probably crazy, but I have everything on a schedule. Dinners at 6:00. Lol
Thanks!
 

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I noticed a gig I recently treated continued to expell after the treatment..it was still in a stressed condition in the treatment tank..once I moved it to the DT...it stopped expelling and colored up nicely and began to eat..it is a perfect specimen now...
 
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1st ... I’m no expert and don’t claim to be... my opinions are strictly from my own experience. I read a lot, watch YouTube videos and I have some close friends that have reef tanks. Everything reefing... is all we talk about.
Anyway, there are experts on here, people who own reef/marine stores, people that have been in this hobby 20+ years. That’s not me... mine is trial and error.
here are my thoughts...
Your anemone looks nice and healthy. I see what you are saying with the color. Do you think there’s a possibility that it’s not a true black widow? No doubt, that was what it was being sold as ...
I’m not 100% sure, that mine is... other than, that’s what they called it/sold it as.
(Mine) Its a deep red... it has the web like appearance...... but, could mine be a red/rose bubble tip anemone? I guess, I can’t say I would know the difference. If you are unsure, maybe ask a pro (on here.)
About the color...
What I’ve found to be true...
it takes them a while to adjust from where they came from... mine came from a store that used a full spectrum and fluorescent lights. I use a lot of actinic light because of my coral. I had to start alternating, using some white light. Experiment with your lights. That has a lot to do with color of the nem. And, it takes time to acclimate to your lights. Your light is adequate, it just takes time. I personally, didn’t really care about the black widow type/name. My thoughts were... deep, colorful red/ opposite of white. This one should do better because of the color, I just have to keep it that way... easier said than done! Receiving/buying a healthy one, is what worked for me. I guess, my point... was to have a healthy/happy BTA. Not so much, as that specific type.
It looks happy/healthy, to me. Maybe, the red will deepen over time. As long as, it’s getting enough light. It should be fine. I like it. It looks nice and healthy, bubbly:)
It has started moving around the rocks a little bit since the last photo. So I am guessing that it is either trying to find better lighting or better flow (maybe even both!) but I am just going to let it do it's thing and see what happens in the next few weeks. Thank you so much for your input!
 

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