Any advice?

Discussion in 'Connecticut Area Reef Society' started by DeepSeaReefer7, Nov 26, 2017.

  1. DeepSeaReefer7

    DeepSeaReefer7 Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys I've decided I want to get back into reefing and looking for some advice
    I finally own my own house so I can go crazy and do whatever I want hah.
    I know I want a basement sump with the display on the first floor is there anything I should be concerned about while doing this?

    I was thinking 150-210 gallon display with
    A 50-100 gallon rubbermaid stock tank for a sump

    This is all going to happen over the span of 6 months or so I'm not in a rush and I want to get it done right the first time
    So I'm going to start buying equipment a little at a time we all know how expensive this hobby is, mostly I'm going to use my tax returns next year.

    So any recommendations on equipment would be great also.
     
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  2. XNavyDiver

    XNavyDiver Insightful answer loading... please wait. R2R Supporter

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    I would say get the best pressure rated return pump you can. I would hard plumb it, dry, outside the sump, in a place where it's very easy to get to for maintenance or replacement.
    Get the biggest skimmer you can. I would look at models rated for 400 gallons or there abouts.
    Those two are just off the top of my head.
     
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  3. Ubergroover

    Ubergroover Engineer by day, Musician/golfer/reefer by night R2R Supporter CTARS Member Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    Make sure your pumps have adequate head pressure. One floor is 12 feet, so if your pump is one floor down your pump needs to be sized correctly. Me, I would be looking for something rated at 18 foot or larger.
     
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  4. RWinfrey

    RWinfrey Well-Known Member R2R Supporter CTARS Member

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    Check out the blue line pumps
     
  5. pecan2phat

    pecan2phat Well-Known Member

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    I used a Reef Octopus Water Blaster HY-10000 plumbed externally and it was plenty from basement to 1st floor. Switched over after many years of an electricity sucking magnetic pump. Also tried an DC 12000 pump and that had hardly any head pressure.
     
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  6. pecan2phat

    pecan2phat Well-Known Member

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    Prior to the Water Blaster, I used a BL 70 HD, was loud and used more electricity IME.
     
  7. Greybeard

    Greybeard Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Build Thread Contributor

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    Take your time. Make sure floors are sufficient to the static load you're going to put them under. Pay attention to maintenance needs, make it serviceable.

    It's a hobby, not a project. No rush... if you're not enjoying the process, why bother?
     
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  8. pecan2phat

    pecan2phat Well-Known Member

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    Would also recommend to go with a 75g standard glass tank vs a rubbermaid.
     
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  9. Ubergroover

    Ubergroover Engineer by day, Musician/golfer/reefer by night R2R Supporter CTARS Member Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    All DC pumps use more electricity than AC pumps...nature of the beast. However in pumps this size it is not much difference. Look at watts in the specs for the pump. Just because a pump is rated for high GPH does not mean it will pump water 12 feet straight up. In this category you get what you pay for. If its controllable electrically, then oversize the pump and dial it back. I have an eflux pump (DC) that is controllable. 1900GPH 14.75' of head pressure. I run it at half speed and its been ticking along 24/7 over a year with no hiccup's...Take your time and pick the best pump you can afford. Its the heart of the tank.
     
  10. DeepSeaReefer7

    DeepSeaReefer7 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice everyone I'm going to take that all into account

    I found a good deal on a 90 gallon would that be to small to do a basement sump
    I figured the basement would double as a frag tank
     
  11. Greybeard

    Greybeard Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Build Thread Contributor

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    I have the exact same pump, been running for 4 months or so now. I'm quite happy with it so far. When I started back into the hobby a couple of years back, I bought a cheap Jabo DC return pump. Worked for about 6 months. Bought a wave pump of the same brand, lasted 4 months. Switched to an Iwaki on that tank. When I was putting this system together, I wanted controllable... took a chance on the Eflux line. Quiet, flow is stable and consistent, what's not to like?
     
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  12. kgstei

    kgstei Well-Known Member CTARS Member

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    Before I give an opinion and man I love giving opinions is what are you looking to accomplish with your tank. Are you looking for an SPS tank? Why a basement sump? Is the basement heated?
     
  13. Ubergroover

    Ubergroover Engineer by day, Musician/golfer/reefer by night R2R Supporter CTARS Member Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    The only issue I ever had was some GFO got in the sump and the pump sucked it up. Bit got chopped up and stuck in the impeller. I bought a spare impeller on Amazon for 16$ replaced it, cleaned the old one out and keep it for a spare. The controller get a little warm, but its a controller it will. So far I would recommend this product line to anyone.
     
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  14. DeepSeaReefer7

    DeepSeaReefer7 Well-Known Member

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    All my old tanks were mixed reefs mostly lps with sps mixed in I'm going for that same style, but the basement is unfinished and unheated but stays relatively warm
    I wanted a basement sump for the ease of maintenance. I hate having to try and work in a sump crammed under a stand
     
  15. jduong916

    jduong916 Well-Known Member

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    Just so happens I have an unused gold reeflo hammerhead/barracuda pump for sale. $250 shipped :).
     
  16. MaiReef

    MaiReef Well-Known Member

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    I agree with a a 75 or 90 gallon under the tank or in the next room/closet. Far less pump needed and heater needs.
     
  17. Ubergroover

    Ubergroover Engineer by day, Musician/golfer/reefer by night R2R Supporter CTARS Member Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    If your basement is warm go for it...I would totally do the same thing if I could!
     
  18. kgstei

    kgstei Well-Known Member CTARS Member

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    I definitely understand wanting more room underneath but I personally would consider what my electric bill was going to be with the added heating and pumping costs. I run a 4-foot, 120 gallon tank with a 40 breeder sump underneath it and 2 Black Box LEDs. My last electric bill was about a hundred bucks. Perhaps someone running a basement sump in the similar climate to Connecticut could give some insight and what their bills might be. Just something to think about.
     
  19. Greybeard

    Greybeard Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Build Thread Contributor

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    Basement sumps sound like a great idea, but there are down sides that should be considered. You have to oversize your pumps, gravity generates considerable pressure on the overflow lines, which can make your overflow noisy, and the simple fact that you can't see the tank when you're making changes in the sump adds a level of complication that you at least need to consider.

    I went with a closet sump this time around. Love not having to work on my hands and knees any more. It's a bit narrow... I'd love to have a bit more work space, but it's sufficient. Vertical drop from overflow to sump water level is about 14". Return lines, maybe 20", since the return compartment water level is a bit lower. Less head pressure, I can get away with a smaller pump. Closet stays warm, so heat required is minimal. I did put a dehumidifier in there, set at 50% RH. It rarely kicks on.

    Sump.jpg
     
  20. DeepSeaReefer7

    DeepSeaReefer7 Well-Known Member

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    Depending on where I put the tank in my living room dictates what I can do with the sump i have a spare bed room that shares a wall but the tank might not be a good fit in that location I can always build a taller stand for the sump in the basement to raise it closer to the ceiling
     
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