Are anemones hard to keep?

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Lost in the Sauce

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Imo, no. Bta's are not hard to keep.

They require certain basic parameters and adequate lighting. They benefit from being fed.

Specific care requirements change by species as do their quirks from nem to nem.

If you have an established setup ( some say 6mo to a year), protection for the nem on all pumps and intakes, space for it to live and grow, I say grab the pretty baby rainbow.

Anenomes can and do walk, some often. They can wreak havoc on other corals of they are moving often and stinging. I have 4 in a 120. Rainbow on the right was 2" across in March. Now it's close to 5" across.
PXL_20210508_043158276.MP.jpg
 

gbroadbridge

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They need a stable tank and plenty of light.

They wreak havoc when they go for a wander.

let the LFS keep them

I keep seeing some nice looking bubble tip’s at my LFS, which are reasonably priced.

Are anemones hard to keep?

—-

I also saw an AMAZING rainbow anemone for only $80. It was a pretty small frag, but it was pretty dang beautiful.
 
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James_O

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If you have an established setup ( some say 6mo to a year), protection for the nem on all pumps and intakes, space for it to live and grow, I say grab the pretty baby rainbow.
Ok. Thank you!

I will wait a few more months, until my tank matures more.

The rainbow was super tempting, but I didn’t have the $80. :/

Their XL rainbows are absolutely MASSIVE. (And expensive- $300!!)
 

dvgyfresh

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Yep, I put nylons over my power heads and wave makers. Not taking a chance.
I have an uncovered gyre lol , my solution is to just use my caulerpa and put it all around the gyre , they take root and don’t mind the strong flow / act as a sponge around the pump/ free nutrient export, but makes the pump a tad weaker
 

NashobaTek

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I have an uncovered gyre lol , my solution is to just use my caulerpa and put it all around the gyre , they take root and don’t mind the strong flow / act as a sponge around the pump/ free nutrient export, but makes the pump a tad weaker
Oh, great idea. I'll have to try that as well. Nylons clog up eventually.
 

PeterB113

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Check this thread
 

MaxTremors

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I keep seeing some nice looking bubble tip’s at my LFS, which are reasonably priced.

Are anemones hard to keep?

—-

I also saw an AMAZING rainbow anemone for only $80. It was a pretty small frag, but it was pretty dang beautiful.
I would wait until your tank has been going for six months or so until you get a bubble tip. Its not that it’ll definitely fail if you don’t wait, but anemones just seem to do better in established tanks. Maxi minis and rock flowers do well in newer tanks (but they don’t host clownfish). Also, $80 for a rainbow BTA is pretty outrageous. Look for local hobbyists or your areas reefer group (they usually have a FB page), and you should be able to find one for $20-$40.
 
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I would wait until your tank has been going for six months or so until you get a bubble tip. Its not that it’ll definitely fail if you don’t wait, but anemones just seem to do better in established tanks. Maxi minis and rock flowers do well in newer tanks (but they don’t host clownfish). Also, $80 for a rainbow BTA is pretty outrageous. Look for local hobbyists or your areas reefer group (they usually have a FB page), and you should be able to find one for $20-$40.
It did seem pretty insane... they do have some really nice coloration, but after looking online, that’s crazy.
 

vetteguy53081

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They’re fairly low maintenance and they can add a really neat look to your tank. Bubble Tip Anemone care requires you to have a strong understanding of these invertebrates if you want them to thrive. They’re not as easy to own as many people think. Thanks to the symbiotic relationship they form with certain fish, they are a joy to watch and care for. This species splits and propagates very easily in the right conditions, resulting in large captive populations.
The length of the tentacles can vary. The same goes for the size and shape of the bulb. With some specimens, the bulb is accompanied by a small tip. Interestingly enough, the tentacles can change based on the anemone’s environment. Below the splay of tentacles is the anemone’s foot. The foot is delicate. Yet, it has simple muscle fibers that help the creature move and anchor onto rocks.
Rose Bubble Tip Anemones are, by far, the most common type you’ll see on the market. They’re prolific propagators, which undoubtedly contributes to their popularity. This type is quite affordable and is a good option for first-time anemone owners. Rainbow bubble Tip Anemone that’s usually considered to be exotic. They’re rarer than standard Rose varieties and their pricing usually reflects that. The base of the Rainbow Bubble Tip Anemone is vibrant neon blue. This color gradually fades into a rose color on the tips of the tentacles.
Green Bubble Tip Anemones are fairly common. Like the Rose variety, these anemones are quite affordable and readily available in the trade.
Many new and seasoned aquarists dream of owning these invertebrates. But proper Bubble Tip Anemone care requires a bit of work to keep these creatures healthy! In short, we usually don’t recommend them for first-time aquarists. Having thorough knowledge about these animals is a must. The invertebrates are sensitive to water changes and require pristine conditions to stay in good shape. Failing to meet their needs can result in early death and damage to the tank environment as a whole. Yes, getting caught in a power head is a concern but rarely occurs. I have 6 (which time to sell a couple of them and none have ever left their spot in the tank.
The most important thing you’ll need to take care of before you bring your anemone home is perfecting the tank and water conditions. You should never place a Bubble Tip Anemone into a tank you just set up.
Take some time to get parameters just right and let the closed environment cycle for a few months. This ensures that conditions are stable and safe. Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quakity test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: Between 77°F and 82°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.4
  • Water hardness: 8 to 12 dKH
  • Specific gravity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to truly thrive because they’re photosynthetic. Basically, that means that they absorb light to make food and grow. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists agree that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your jets at the anemone. The creatures enjoy subtle movement at all times. But too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. twice a week feedings is ample.
 

CanuckReefer

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They’re fairly low maintenance and they can add a really neat look to your tank. Bubble Tip Anemone care requires you to have a strong understanding of these invertebrates if you want them to thrive. They’re not as easy to own as many people think. Thanks to the symbiotic relationship they form with certain fish, they are a joy to watch and care for. This species splits and propagates very easily in the right conditions, resulting in large captive populations.
The length of the tentacles can vary. The same goes for the size and shape of the bulb. With some specimens, the bulb is accompanied by a small tip. Interestingly enough, the tentacles can change based on the anemone’s environment. Below the splay of tentacles is the anemone’s foot. The foot is delicate. Yet, it has simple muscle fibers that help the creature move and anchor onto rocks.
Rose Bubble Tip Anemones are, by far, the most common type you’ll see on the market. They’re prolific propagators, which undoubtedly contributes to their popularity. This type is quite affordable and is a good option for first-time anemone owners. Rainbow bubble Tip Anemone that’s usually considered to be exotic. They’re rarer than standard Rose varieties and their pricing usually reflects that. The base of the Rainbow Bubble Tip Anemone is vibrant neon blue. This color gradually fades into a rose color on the tips of the tentacles.
Green Bubble Tip Anemones are fairly common. Like the Rose variety, these anemones are quite affordable and readily available in the trade.
Many new and seasoned aquarists dream of owning these invertebrates. But proper Bubble Tip Anemone care requires a bit of work to keep these creatures healthy! In short, we usually don’t recommend them for first-time aquarists. Having thorough knowledge about these animals is a must. The invertebrates are sensitive to water changes and require pristine conditions to stay in good shape. Failing to meet their needs can result in early death and damage to the tank environment as a whole. Yes, getting caught in a power head is a concern but rarely occurs. I have 6 (which time to sell a couple of them and none have ever left their spot in the tank.
The most important thing you’ll need to take care of before you bring your anemone home is perfecting the tank and water conditions. You should never place a Bubble Tip Anemone into a tank you just set up.
Take some time to get parameters just right and let the closed environment cycle for a few months. This ensures that conditions are stable and safe. Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quakity test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: Between 77°F and 82°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.4
  • Water hardness: 8 to 12 dKH
  • Specific gravity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to truly thrive because they’re photosynthetic. Basically, that means that they absorb light to make food and grow. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists agree that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your jets at the anemone. The creatures enjoy subtle movement at all times. But too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. twice a week feedings is ample.
Well written synopsis... question for ya. My LTA gets a twice a week bay scallop or small red shrimp, I've been dosing live phyto over the last few months and notice a marked improvement in vibrant colour and inflation size. I was reading another poster in another thread stating live phyto will do nothing for Nem's, my experience says quite the contrary. I am assuming this is the 'zoo's ' within Nem that are happy with the phyto dosing. Thoughts?
 

vetteguy53081

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Well written synopsis... question for ya. My LTA gets a twice a week bay scallop or small red shrimp, I've been dosing live phyto over the last few months and notice a marked improvement in vibrant colour and inflation size. I was reading another poster in another thread stating live phyto will do nothing for Nem's, my experience says quite the contrary. I am assuming this is the 'zoo's ' within Nem that are happy with the phyto dosing. Thoughts?
I dont do phyto for mine either. Light is more essential. Feeding them will increase color and reproduction (splitting)
 

CanuckReefer

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I dont do phyto for mine either. Light is more essential. Feeding them will increase color and reproduction (splitting)
Ya other factor is the lighting assumed in my case, only had 2 T5, added about 60 watts of LED to supplement ( 90 gallon) and it took off...
 
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