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jackalexander

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Ahhh… So I assume you have GHA (green hair algae) and you have been scouring the internet for success stories and ways people have beaten it. I was in your place 8 months ago but most methods I tried ended up failing so I’ll share how I defeated it. So here’s the beginning… I purchased a frag of birds nest from my LFS and I saw this funny looking hair algae on the frag but I didn’t think much of it. This was the mistake that nearly put me out of the hobby, a small mistake that led to the loss of hundreds of dollars and countless hours. The algae began growing slowly and quietly beneath the frag plug and one day I decided to move the frag and I noticed that the hair algae had become a bush. I knew immediately this would be an issue so I scrubbed it with a tooth brush and thought that was the end of that. Unfortunately for me, that was an even dumber mistake that allowed the hair algae to spread across the tank. Small patches began popping up and this gave me the motivation to try and eradicate it. I started flipping rocks upside down, didn’t work. I then started putting the rocks underneath the sand as much as possible, didn’t work. I got all types of snails, sea hairs and lettuce nudibranch. I decided it was time to step up the game and start using hydrogen peroxide. This came as a complete failure and I realized that I was dealing with a very aggressive and stubborn type of green hair algae. I then turned to the “miracle” vibrant. Turns out that didn’t work either. Double doses and all… Nothing was working. After months of fighting and losing corals due to bleaching and nuisance, I came to the conclusion that this wasn’t going to work out. So, I just decided to do the bare minimum to keep my fish alive and even then, my fish started to die off because of my lack of motivation. This was my breaking point, I realized that I wasn’t going to beat this algae and I could no longer properly care for my animals. But suddenly, I got a burst of motivation after going to my LFS after months of neglect and disaster. I made a plan… I was going to kick this green hair algae in the butt. I started by removing my corals from the rocks and scrubbing the rocks every single day with a tooth brush and syphoning it out while also doing 5g water changes. This was expensive but it was completely worth it. I then started putting filter floss in my first chamber, I would replace it everyday. I then got a lawnmower blenny and a small sailfin tang (I know, I know). These little guys were absolutely amazing and finished the job for me. I had to do this whole process for 3-4 weeks. By the end, I had lost $300 in coral as a direct result from the hair algae and $400 in fish indirectly from the hair algae. I ended up spending $200 on water (LFS bought) and around $20 in filter floss. In hindsight, I should have just spent the extra money to get rid of it before it became a problem. I hope this thread gives someone motivation and helps prevent similar issues from progressing.
E3BBB5C6-94DB-4266-9488-D728A53FB251.jpeg
2BAE7388-9472-465A-9B28-E00B3CC96A25.jpeg
The first image was taken in June at the height of my issue. The second image is from today, completely GHA free. I hope this thread helps a lot of people.
 
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i cant think

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Ahhh… So I assume you have GHA (green hair algae) and you have been scouring the internet for success stories and ways people have beaten it. I was in your place 8 months ago but most methods I tried ended up failing so I’ll share how I defeated it. So here’s the beginning… I purchased a frag of birds nest from my LFS and I saw this funny looking hair algae on the frag but I didn’t think much of it. This was the mistake that nearly put me out of the hobby, a small mistake that led to the loss of hundreds of dollars and countless hours. The algae began growing slowly and quietly beneath the frag plug and one day I decided to move the frag and I noticed that the hair algae had become a bush. I knew immediately this would be an issue so I scrubbed it with a tooth brush and thought that was the end of that. Unfortunately for me, that was an even dumber mistake that allowed the hair algae to spread across the tank. Small patches began popping up and this gave me the motivation to try and eradicate it. I started flipping rocks upside down, didn’t work. I then started putting the rocks underneath the sand as much as possible, didn’t work. I got all types of snails, sea hairs and lettuce nudibranch. I decided it was time to step up the game and start using hydrogen peroxide. This came as a complete failure and I realized that I was dealing with a very aggressive and stubborn type of green hair algae. I then turned to the “miracle” vibrant. Turns out that didn’t work either. Double doses and all… Nothing was working. After months of fighting and losing corals due to bleaching and nuisance, I came to the conclusion that this wasn’t going to work out. So, I just decided to do the bare minimum to keep my fish alive and even then, my fish started to die off because of my lack of motivation. This was my breaking point, I realized that I wasn’t going to beat this algae and I could no longer properly care for my animals. But suddenly, I got a burst of motivation after going to my LFS after months of neglect and disaster. I made a plan… I was going to kick this green hair algae in the butt. I started by removing my corals from the rocks and scrubbing the rocks every single day with a tooth brush and syphoning it out while also doing 5g water changes. This was expensive but it was completely worth it. I then started putting filter floss in my first chamber, I would replace it everyday. I then got a lawnmower blenny and a small sailfin tang (I know, I know). These little guys were absolutely amazing and finished the job for me. I had to do this whole process for 3-4 weeks. By the end, I had lost $300 in coral as a direct result from the hair algae and $400 in fish indirectly from the hair algae. I ended up spending $200 on water (LFS bought) and around $20 in filter floss. In hindsight, I should have just spent the extra money to get rid of it before it became a problem. I hope this thread gives someone motivation and helps prevent similar issues from progressing.
E3BBB5C6-94DB-4266-9488-D728A53FB251.jpeg
2BAE7388-9472-465A-9B28-E00B3CC96A25.jpeg
The first image was taken in June at the height of my issue. The second image is from today, completely GHA free. I hope this thread helps a lot of people.
I’ve been battling Cyano and it’s started to die off - GHA has grown in certain places which I’d making me think cyano will get replaced by GHA, so I may need to use this method soon! I have a Blenny in the tank already and I think he’s been chewing parts of it off the rocks and I’ve watched him mow the back wall of GHA to the point the background is clear black
 
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jackalexander

jackalexander

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I’ve been battling Cyano and it’s started to die off - GHA has grown in certain places which I’d making me think cyano will get replaced by GHA, so I may need to use this method soon! I have a Blenny in the tank already and I think he’s been chewing parts of it off the rocks and I’ve watched him mow the back wall of GHA to the point the background is clear black
that GHA will definitely beat back the cyano! I’d start working on that immediately! Those blennies love when the gha is really short!
 

DrZoidburg

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Peroxide does work a lot of people don't use enough. The trouble though is if you keep certain inverts you cant go that high. Another way get urchins, snails, and dose phosphate. A lot of people don't have enough inverts either. Thought process behind that is urchin cleans rock, bacteria fill bare space. These guys need phosphate to rapidly multiply. Then bacteria strong enough to outcompete algae.
 

Sleeping Giant

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Ahhh… So I assume you have GHA (green hair algae) and you have been scouring the internet for success stories and ways people have beaten it. I was in your place 8 months ago but most methods I tried ended up failing so I’ll share how I defeated it. So here’s the beginning… I purchased a frag of birds nest from my LFS and I saw this funny looking hair algae on the frag but I didn’t think much of it. This was the mistake that nearly put me out of the hobby, a small mistake that led to the loss of hundreds of dollars and countless hours. The algae began growing slowly and quietly beneath the frag plug and one day I decided to move the frag and I noticed that the hair algae had become a bush. I knew immediately this would be an issue so I scrubbed it with a tooth brush and thought that was the end of that. Unfortunately for me, that was an even dumber mistake that allowed the hair algae to spread across the tank. Small patches began popping up and this gave me the motivation to try and eradicate it. I started flipping rocks upside down, didn’t work. I then started putting the rocks underneath the sand as much as possible, didn’t work. I got all types of snails, sea hairs and lettuce nudibranch. I decided it was time to step up the game and start using hydrogen peroxide. This came as a complete failure and I realized that I was dealing with a very aggressive and stubborn type of green hair algae. I then turned to the “miracle” vibrant. Turns out that didn’t work either. Double doses and all… Nothing was working. After months of fighting and losing corals due to bleaching and nuisance, I came to the conclusion that this wasn’t going to work out. So, I just decided to do the bare minimum to keep my fish alive and even then, my fish started to die off because of my lack of motivation. This was my breaking point, I realized that I wasn’t going to beat this algae and I could no longer properly care for my animals. But suddenly, I got a burst of motivation after going to my LFS after months of neglect and disaster. I made a plan… I was going to kick this green hair algae in the butt. I started by removing my corals from the rocks and scrubbing the rocks every single day with a tooth brush and syphoning it out while also doing 5g water changes. This was expensive but it was completely worth it. I then started putting filter floss in my first chamber, I would replace it everyday. I then got a lawnmower blenny and a small sailfin tang (I know, I know). These little guys were absolutely amazing and finished the job for me. I had to do this whole process for 3-4 weeks. By the end, I had lost $300 in coral as a direct result from the hair algae and $400 in fish indirectly from the hair algae. I ended up spending $200 on water (LFS bought) and around $20 in filter floss. In hindsight, I should have just spent the extra money to get rid of it before it became a problem. I hope this thread gives someone motivation and helps prevent similar issues from progressing.
E3BBB5C6-94DB-4266-9488-D728A53FB251.jpeg
2BAE7388-9472-465A-9B28-E00B3CC96A25.jpeg
The first image was taken in June at the height of my issue. The second image is from today, completely GHA free. I hope this thread helps a lot of people.
Great job
 
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Biokabe

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Peroxide does work a lot of people don't use enough. The trouble though is if you keep certain inverts you cant go that high. Another way get urchins, snails, and dose phosphate. A lot of people don't have enough inverts either. Thought process behind that is urchin cleans rock, bacteria fill bare space. These guys need phosphate to rapidly multiply. Then bacteria strong enough to outcompete algae.

The problem with broadcast-dosing peroxide is that to get to the point where it's impacting GHA, you've also elevated it enough that it starts stressing corals. What I've found the better solution to be is to spot-dose it with pumps off, preferably just before a water change. Turn off the circulation, fill a small syringe with H2O2 (I use 12% solution), and apply small amount directly to the algae in question. The reaction is almost immediate, with the algae turning white and sometimes even detaching from the rock within minutes. Remove the algae manually at that point, then do a water change.

I've been dealing with a GHA issue as well, and this is part of what has helped me to finally turn the corner and start to see bare rock again.
 
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