Largest clams in private aquariums?

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Reef of Fillory

Reef of Fillory

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I am a fan of using giant clams as center pieces for our reefs, and a peninsula style tank with a showpiece clam would be a sight to see.
Awesome clam, i'm looking to do a 10-12' x 3' x 3' tank, with a large clam as major part of the display.


My maxima is roughly 8-9" the derasa is about 3.5".
I saw a couple of 6" clams online that i've been thinking about going for. yours look great!
 

Brew12

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I am a fan of using giant clams as center pieces for our reefs, and a peninsula style tank with a showpiece clam would be a sight to see. They make the perfect colorful accent to a large reef. But I have learned that they present a unique challenge when they reach a certain size in proportion to the rest of the aquarium contents like live, rock, corals, and fish. I've found this out the hard way after growing my 30" Gigas for almost 10 years. When a clam or anything for that matter becomes the largest living structure in a reef, it will create its own little reef within a reef, and what makes clams very unique is that they have the ability to directly feed the inhabitants that seek shelter in the contours of the mantle and shell. Everyday at least twice a day the clam belches a smorgasbord of food that the fish love to devour. So with time they will associate the clam with food and eventually they will take a bite. I can't tell how may fish I've gone through over the years that all started off as "clam safe" only to turn the clam into an 100+lb buffet. Then comes the filtration capacities of these monsters when it comes to their consumption of N and Ps. It is very hard to quantify but I can tell you it is significant. When the clam is "ON" it can filter a 500+ gallon system. Finally the calcium and alk demand is incredible. I use 3 cups of BRS CACL and 3 cups of baking soda every week. I think these are just a few things that make owning a large clam uniquely challenging, and why I think many people get rid of large clams once they get to a certain size. When my Gigas dies I don't see myself getting another, even if it was given to me. In my opinion it really limits your options when it comes to fish and corals. Also what do you if a 100+lb clam dies in your tank? Or spawns? Which it does every summer.
P1170590.JPG



I was able to resolve some of my issues by using 3 tanks instead of one large "clam tank". 2- 36"x30"x25 and the clam tank is 60"x30"x31".
P1170660.JPG


P1170587.JPG
:eek:
;Drool;Drool;Drool;Drool
 

Fercho

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I am a fan of using giant clams as center pieces for our reefs, and a peninsula style tank with a showpiece clam would be a sight to see. They make the perfect colorful accent to a large reef. But I have learned that they present a unique challenge when they reach a certain size in proportion to the rest of the aquarium contents like live, rock, corals, and fish. I've found this out the hard way after growing my 30" Gigas for almost 10 years. When a clam or anything for that matter becomes the largest living structure in a reef, it will create its own little reef within a reef, and what makes clams very unique is that they have the ability to directly feed the inhabitants that seek shelter in the contours of the mantle and shell. Everyday at least twice a day the clam belches a smorgasbord of food that the fish love to devour. So with time they will associate the clam with food and eventually they will take a bite. I can't tell how may fish I've gone through over the years that all started off as "clam safe" only to turn the clam into an 100+lb buffet. Then comes the filtration capacities of these monsters when it comes to their consumption of N and Ps. It is very hard to quantify but I can tell you it is significant. When the clam is "ON" it can filter a 500+ gallon system. Finally the calcium and alk demand is incredible. I use 3 cups of BRS CACL and 3 cups of baking soda every week. I think these are just a few things that make owning a large clam uniquely challenging, and why I think many people get rid of large clams once they get to a certain size. When my Gigas dies I don't see myself getting another, even if it was given to me. In my opinion it really limits your options when it comes to fish and corals. Also what do you if a 100+lb clam dies in your tank? Or spawns? Which it does every summer.
P1170590.JPG



I was able to resolve some of my issues by using 3 tanks instead of one large "clam tank". 2- 36"x30"x25 and the clam tank is 60"x30"x31".
P1170660.JPG


P1170587.JPG
Incredible!
How do you deal with the spawning?
I have an 10" squamosa, and although i have not noted any spawning, i do worry about it happening when i least expexted.
I saw a video in youtube about a reefer having water quality problems when his gigant clam spawned.
 

Yuki Rihwa

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Incredible!
How do you deal with the spawning?
I have an 10" squamosa, and although i have not noted any spawning, i do worry about it happening when i least expexted.
I saw a video in youtube about a reefer having water quality problems when his gigant clam spawned.
Well, my Oyster spawned last time and made my water look milky white for pretty much 24 hours (I have no skimmer), I just lets nature work it way out and the water cleared out next day, I have not notice any water quality issues but I'm very sure all my other filters eater (clams) are extreme happy about the spawn incident LOL they all look awesome next day probably belly full of free very nutrition meal:)
 

revhtree

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I am a fan of using giant clams as center pieces for our reefs, and a peninsula style tank with a showpiece clam would be a sight to see. They make the perfect colorful accent to a large reef. But I have learned that they present a unique challenge when they reach a certain size in proportion to the rest of the aquarium contents like live, rock, corals, and fish. I've found this out the hard way after growing my 30" Gigas for almost 10 years. When a clam or anything for that matter becomes the largest living structure in a reef, it will create its own little reef within a reef, and what makes clams very unique is that they have the ability to directly feed the inhabitants that seek shelter in the contours of the mantle and shell. Everyday at least twice a day the clam belches a smorgasbord of food that the fish love to devour. So with time they will associate the clam with food and eventually they will take a bite. I can't tell how may fish I've gone through over the years that all started off as "clam safe" only to turn the clam into an 100+lb buffet. Then comes the filtration capacities of these monsters when it comes to their consumption of N and Ps. It is very hard to quantify but I can tell you it is significant. When the clam is "ON" it can filter a 500+ gallon system. Finally the calcium and alk demand is incredible. I use 3 cups of BRS CACL and 3 cups of baking soda every week. I think these are just a few things that make owning a large clam uniquely challenging, and why I think many people get rid of large clams once they get to a certain size. When my Gigas dies I don't see myself getting another, even if it was given to me. In my opinion it really limits your options when it comes to fish and corals. Also what do you if a 100+lb clam dies in your tank? Or spawns? Which it does every summer.
P1170590.JPG



I was able to resolve some of my issues by using 3 tanks instead of one large "clam tank". 2- 36"x30"x25 and the clam tank is 60"x30"x31".
P1170660.JPG


P1170587.JPG
Just marvelous! As in I am marveled!
 
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gurumasta

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I am a fan of using giant clams as center pieces for our reefs, and a peninsula style tank with a showpiece clam would be a sight to see. They make the perfect colorful accent to a large reef. But I have learned that they present a unique challenge when they reach a certain size in proportion to the rest of the aquarium contents like live, rock, corals, and fish. I've found this out the hard way after growing my 30" Gigas for almost 10 years. When a clam or anything for that matter becomes the largest living structure in a reef, it will create its own little reef within a reef, and what makes clams very unique is that they have the ability to directly feed the inhabitants that seek shelter in the contours of the mantle and shell. Everyday at least twice a day the clam belches a smorgasbord of food that the fish love to devour. So with time they will associate the clam with food and eventually they will take a bite. I can't tell how may fish I've gone through over the years that all started off as "clam safe" only to turn the clam into an 100+lb buffet. Then comes the filtration capacities of these monsters when it comes to their consumption of N and Ps. It is very hard to quantify but I can tell you it is significant. When the clam is "ON" it can filter a 500+ gallon system. Finally the calcium and alk demand is incredible. I use 3 cups of BRS CACL and 3 cups of baking soda every week. I think these are just a few things that make owning a large clam uniquely challenging, and why I think many people get rid of large clams once they get to a certain size. When my Gigas dies I don't see myself getting another, even if it was given to me. In my opinion it really limits your options when it comes to fish and corals. Also what do you if a 100+lb clam dies in your tank? Or spawns? Which it does every summer.
P1170590.JPG



I was able to resolve some of my issues by using 3 tanks instead of one large "clam tank". 2- 36"x30"x25 and the clam tank is 60"x30"x31".
P1170660.JPG


P1170587.JPG
Insane!! Wowza!!
 
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