Melting Xenia ?

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FishyFishFish

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I’m still fairly new to this but I think your LFS has given you some bad advice.

Things that I would concentrate on if I was in your position.

The first 2 (to be done as soon as possible) are:

1) Test for ammonia. If there is none then you are in a better place. If there is some then you need to do a big water change and stop adding anything else until it is under control.

2) Get a consistent, accurate way to measure salinity. A refractometer has been mentioned and that is what I use, but there are other options as well, such as ‘pen’ type conductivity devices from Hanna. Whatever you get, learn how to calibrate it and use it properly. Then measure the salinity your tank water.

After that, you can look into stabilizing the Alk and other parameters. Don’t do any water changes or top ups unless you know the salinity of the water that you are adding, otherwise you could be making things worse.

And I would stop adding anything extra like coral vitamins until everything is under control.
 
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Lmcg8020

Lmcg8020

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THANK YOU how do I test for amon
I’m still fairly new to this but I think your LFS has given you some bad advice.

Things that I would concentrate on if I was in your position.

The first 2 (to be done as soon as possible) are:

1) Test for ammonia. If there is none then you are in a better place. If there is some then you need to do a big water change and stop adding anything else until it is under control.

2) Get a consistent, accurate way to measure salinity. A refractometer has been mentioned and that is what I use, but there are other options as well, such as ‘pen’ type conductivity devices from Hanna. Whatever you get, learn how to calibrate it and use it properly. Then measure the salinity your tank water.

After that, you can look into stabilizing the Alk and other parameters. Don’t do any water changes or top ups unless you know the salinity of the water that you are adding, otherwise you could be making things worse.

And I would stop adding anything extra like coral vitamins until everything is under control.
 
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Lmcg8020

Lmcg8020

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I’m still fairly new to this but I think your LFS has given you some bad advice.

Things that I would concentrate on if I was in your position.

The first 2 (to be done as soon as possible) are:

1) Test for ammonia. If there is none then you are in a better place. If there is some then you need to do a big water change and stop adding anything else until it is under control.

2) Get a consistent, accurate way to measure salinity. A refractometer has been mentioned and that is what I use, but there are other options as well, such as ‘pen’ type conductivity devices from Hanna. Whatever you get, learn how to calibrate it and use it properly. Then measure the salinity your tank water.

After that, you can look into stabilizing the Alk and other parameters. Don’t do any water changes or top ups unless you know the salinity of the water that you are adding, otherwise you could be making things worse.

And I would stop adding anything extra like coral vitamins until everything is under control.
How do I test for ammonia? And I have a refractometer as well. Thank you!
 
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FishyFishFish

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The test kit you have is the reef test kit. The one I would use on a new tank is the saltwater test kit, which has ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and PH tests in it.

As you have a refractometer, I would mix up some salt water (assuming you have suitable RODI water to use) in a separate container ready for a water change. Make the salinity of this slightly higher than the water in your tank (but not too high) and this will help to slowly bring the salinity back up to where you want it. If you’re doing small water changes (i.e. 10%) you can probably get away with 1.025 for the new water. If you’re doing a bigger water change I would go for 1.023 and slowly bring it up in stages. This water needs to be heated as well before it is put in the tank.

Don’t add salt directly to the tank.
 
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How do I test for ammonia? And I have a refractometer as well. Thank you!
Do you have the refractor Calibration fluid that it comes with ? Make sure to check calibration at least one time to make sure it’s right. Then if very careful with it and always clean it then it should stay pretty close to calibrated for long time. Double check every once in awhile after that
 

melonheadorion

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i am also very new to all of this type of stuff as well, but i will say that it seems that the OP has jumped into something that there is little knowledge, or preparation for, and i feel that youre just going way too fast. i personally wanted to do a coral setup, but i knew that there is more too it than there is just with keeping a saltwater tank going properly without corals involved, which have many more parameters to worrry about.
i would highly suggest doing alot of digging into articles and videos that help explain all of the ins and outs of saltwater fish keeping/reef keeping. i dont want to sound like an butt, but if one of the questions that comes up is "how do i test for ammonia", youre gonna have a bad time, and you are behind the curve so far that youre throwing stuff at the wall to see stuff stick and just hoping for the best.
i personally would start with just getting down to understanding and have good enough knowledge on just how to keep fish in a saltwater environment. that will give you enough knowledge to know the nitrogen cycle, how to do water changes, how to do testings, learning the ups and downs with all of that (things such s problems that arise in it), and then when you are comfortable with that, then jump into the other stuff. with what you have, and being really new to it, i feel you went from 0 to 100 in a week, and are not prepared for it. the lack of different tests and devices shows it. fishkeeping, especially saltwater, isnt forgiving on fish and other livebeings. by the time you get the supplies you ordered, you may have lost corals already while you are waiting to receive it.
 

CanuckReefer

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Ok back to this....not for the original intention but for you. What were you taught ? Somebody told you I got this live rock its special it's the best and It comes from my tank! Not only that I'm gonna give you the sand too as a bonus to spike it. You simply move it all and Bob's your Uncle. No nitrate/phos/ or ammonia spike when I came over and set it all up for ya with big smile.
Live sand in a bag new means nothing. In fact it is mostly a non factor. Moving old sand? You saw that right? She brought in old sand according to the previous posts or at least according to your suggestion. That in itself is a disaster waiting to happen. The amount of detritus and junk in there would spike it off charts alone. I'm tired and really should go to bed, this is pointless
Live sand comes in a bag new... live rock is live rock. Sorry I disagree. Shoot if that’s the case my stuff should have all died off when I did a substrate change out with a 100% water change.

Or if someone with a bare bottom tank, dose a 100% water change.

sorry I completely disagree, this goes against everything I been taught.
 
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Lmcg8020

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Do you have the refractor Calibration fluid that it comes with ? Make sure to check calibration at least one time to make sure it’s right. Then if very careful with it and always clean it then it should stay pretty close to calibrated for long time. Double check every once in awhile after that
Will do yes I have, I’m actually a calibration tech so I can at least do that lol
 
Maxout

What have you found to be the best things/methods to beat hair algae? (choose all that apply)

  • Hydrogen peroxide

    Votes: 12 14.6%
  • Lawn Mower Blenny (or other fish)

    Votes: 17 20.7%
  • Manual Removal

    Votes: 42 51.2%
  • Rock Scrubbing

    Votes: 15 18.3%
  • Lowered Phosphates

    Votes: 17 20.7%
  • Tank Blackouts

    Votes: 6 7.3%
  • Urchins

    Votes: 20 24.4%
  • Fluconazole

    Votes: 6 7.3%
  • Granular Ferric Oxide (GFO)

    Votes: 7 8.5%
  • UV Sterilizer

    Votes: 6 7.3%
  • Refugium

    Votes: 20 24.4%
  • Algae Scrubber

    Votes: 7 8.5%
  • Clean Up Crew

    Votes: 42 51.2%
  • Lighting Change

    Votes: 8 9.8%
  • Sea Hare

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  • Vibrant

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  • Other (please explain in thread)

    Votes: 5 6.1%

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