The Wrasse Lover's Thread!

Discussion in 'Fish Discussion' started by Breakin Newz, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. Maritimer

    Maritimer Moderator Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter Reef Squad Leader CTARS Member R2R Excellence Award Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    You might consider a possum wrasse or pink-streaked wrasse. Both very small and peaceful, spending much of their time examining the rockwork (often interior rockwork - they can be a bit cryptic) for morsels to snack on. If you're not working with tiny shrimp like sexies, a leopard wrasse might offer some assistance, as well.

    ~Bruce
     
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  2. Abhishek

    Abhishek Valuable Member

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    Yeah I agree with Bruce's suggestions . The ones that would absolutely help you are leopards, Halichoeres and anampses but no guarantee on shrimps .
    If you want to venture out of the way and would like a little challenge , a pipe fish would do wonders against those buggers but first you have qt it properly and make it eat frozen .

    Regards,
    Abhishek
     
  3. saltyhog

    saltyhog Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Squad R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2018

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    Of all the Halichoeres wrasses I think H. chrysus is one of the most invert safe. I never had any problems with mine going after snails or shrimp despite the fact that he was approaching 6" in size.
     
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  4. Smite

    Smite Active Member

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    Can someone help me ID this wrasse? My LFS has had it in the frag tank for 5-6 months with no issues and said it was friendly with the melenarus (also pictured).

    Thanks

    Matt
     
  5. Smite

    Smite Active Member

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    20171223_160615.jpg
     
  6. Maritimer

    Maritimer Moderator Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter Reef Squad Leader CTARS Member R2R Excellence Award Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    Looks like Cirrhilabrus cyanopleura, the blue-head fairy wrasse to me.

    ~Bruce
     
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  7. d-man

    d-man Active Member

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    Agreed^
     
  8. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Showcase Editor Expert Contributor Partner Member Partner Member 2018

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    Anything that will be effective against aefw will be a risk with shrimp.

    Possum and pink streak wrasse may consume some and would be safe with shrimp, but due to their small size and cryptic nature may not eliminate the flat worms.

    Halichoeres have done a good job in my experience, but as they get bigger are more of a risk to shrimp.

    Leopards have been reluctant to eat aefw ime.

    Pseudojuloides species will pick at flat worms and are pretty shrimp safe.
     
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  9. tkiry1

    tkiry1 Well-Known Member

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    I have fish only and my guy is getting nasty... Lol.. Try and pull him.. Great looking fish though...
     
  10. Abhishek

    Abhishek Valuable Member

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    Exactly !!! Well I would add Anampses along with Halichoeres for flatworms . Am poor to afford lennardis or feminis but cheysocephalus that I have was introduced in my friend's tank infested with flatworms and it literally dessimated them .
    However , of all Halichoeres I would be cautious of adding H.Melanarus as I have found them to get mean with age .
    But my observations might be wrong as am still novice learning here from experienced guys like @eatbreakfast abd @Maritimer .

    On a side note - guys am super excited to have picked up a trio of Halichoeres iridis that are in qt .
    Am slowly converting my tank to Maceopharyngdon , Anampses and Halichoeres and Psedojuloides only and someday have all my dream ones in the soon to be started 220 gallon tank

    Does anyone know what happened to Halichoeres Rubricephalus ? I have been trying for over a year to source some .

    Regards,
    Abhishek
     
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  11. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Showcase Editor Expert Contributor Partner Member Partner Member 2018

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    H. rubricephalus is never super abundant. They are only found in a very limited range near the Bangaii atoll.
     
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  12. ascheff

    ascheff Member

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    I'm looking for some advice please. I was lucky enough to get my hands on a little Paracheilinus piscilineatus female. She'll be finishing 12 days of TTM tomorrow, is very active and eats very well. She is however very tiny. To illustrate just how tiny, I've included a photo of her in front of a 50mm / almost 2 inch PVC fitting for scale.

    Therein lies my uncertainty. I'm somewhat hesitant to add her to my display tank, concerned that she might not be able to compete with the other fishes for food. The bigger and most dominant are H. marginatus, H. leucoxanthus, a pair of lapillus and a C. lineatus. There are a bunch a smaller ones too, all the way down to the smallest, a P. ataenia and Elacatinus oceanops, that are both fat and have no problem fending for themselves. Both are smaller than the new girl.

    The alternative would be to add her to my frag tank in my sump for a few months, which is about 20" x 20" x 15" with rock and plenty of live food. I'm however not convinced this is the best plan either, as these are social creatures by nature, and spending months in solitary at such a young age might cause issues later.

    Anyone have any personal experience adding such a young wrasse with a bunch of adult wrasses?


    IMG_20171226_123433_2.jpg
     
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  13. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Showcase Editor Expert Contributor Partner Member Partner Member 2018

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    It should be fine being added to the group, but going into the frag tank will not cause problems later on.
     
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  14. Abhishek

    Abhishek Valuable Member

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    I would use an acclimation box to socialize the newbie to the group for a few days and then introduce in the main tank .
    If he's eating well and strong enough , she can stand her ground and make her way . But I would observe their behavior through the acclimation box and take next steps .
    Sometimes while introducing small wrasses , I often take the bigger ones that's bullying everyone out for a day or 2 and then release the smaller ones . Did so twice and it helped level the playground when the big one was reintroduced .

    Regards,
    Abhishek
     
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  15. ascheff

    ascheff Member

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    Thank you gentlemen.

    This is reassuring, and would be what I prefer.

    This I'll definitely do. Since she is so small she'll have no problem spending couple of days in there until I'm convinced there will be no problems after introduction.

    Luckily I have no bullies. Some get a bit pushy during feeding time (looking at you Mr. Marginatus), but never aggressive. There are definite hierarchies, but everyone knows their place, so I get nothing more that the occasional posturing and short chases to maintain the status quo.

    Thanks again.
     
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  16. saltyhog

    saltyhog Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Squad R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2018

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    TJ, is P. attenuatus availability seasonal? I don't seem to have seen any offered in some time now. Who has them most often?
     
  17. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Showcase Editor Expert Contributor Partner Member Partner Member 2018

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    Intermittent individuals come in through Kenya or Madagascar, but the numbers that were coming in a few years ago stopped. When they were more frequently available they were coming out of Kenya, but they seem to have migrated away from where they were being collected. But it doesn't seem to be seasonal, because, at least for a temporary part of the year they would be available, but it's been a couple of years now.
     
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  18. gatekeeperdi

    gatekeeperdi Member UK Reef Club Member

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  19. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Showcase Editor Expert Contributor Partner Member Partner Member 2018

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  20. gatekeeperdi

    gatekeeperdi Member UK Reef Club Member

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    Thanks. Is it likely to change to a male in time? There are also numerous other wrasse, Macropharyngodon Cyanoguttatus Wrasse Female, Halichoeres iridis juvenile female, Anampses Lineatus Female, Paracheilinus mccoskeri, Hawaiian black spot cleaner in the tank. Thanks.
     
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