Dino getting worse?

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fsas89

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Hello, So I have the long stringy booger type dino. I just started dosing microbacter7 in morning, and dr tims waste away at night. It seems to be getting worse...what else should I be doing that im missing? turned skimmer off for 4-7 hours after dosing.
 
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Micro-Reefs Aquarium

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Hello, So I have the long stringy booger type dino. I just started dosing microbacter7 in morning, and dr tims waste away at night. It seems to be getting worse...what else should I be doing that im missing? turned skimmer off for 4-7 hours after dosing.
I am with you also in this fight, I just diagnosed one of my systems to have Dinos, I did the coffee filter test. I started yesterday, I purchased equal to Microbacter 7 and read article to raise my temps from 77-78F to 81-82F so I am up to 82 degrees. You can read about it on the forums and youtube, I read a lot before I pulled the trigger.

What I have noticed and this is my opinion, is that my dinos exploded in the increase of the temp and the Micro-bacter 7, I feel it's metabolism is running higher in the warmer water and it will exhaust what ever it is taking on in my tank.

I will let you know as I progress to day #3.

Have you done the microscope ID?

I have posted 3 videos of hoping someone can ID the Dino I have.
 

Nateaqua

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I been having Dino’s in my main tank, but have been using microbacter clean. It works great but not a overnight fix. Make sure you follow the bottle directions exactly. Make sure you vacuum off the rocks or sand bed when you see them. Do this durning the day, as at night they disappear into the water stream. I also do two 30% water changers every 8 days. Change your filter socks every day. Make sure you clean out your sump also. Also a UV light make a great difference.
microbacter7 will not help at this point. Good luck, will take a couple weeks or more.
 
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fsas89

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I am with you also in this fight, I just diagnosed one of my systems to have Dinos, I did the coffee filter test. I started yesterday, I purchased equal to Microbacter 7 and read article to raise my temps from 77-78F to 81-82F so I am up to 82 degrees. You can read about it on the forums and youtube, I read a lot before I pulled the trigger.

What I have noticed and this is my opinion, is that my dinos exploded in the increase of the temp and the Micro-bacter 7, I feel it's metabolism is running higher in the warmer water and it will exhaust what ever it is taking on in my tank.

I will let you know as I progress to day #3.

Have you done the microscope ID?

I have posted 3 videos of hoping someone can ID the Dino I have.
Sounds like I did the same thing minus the temp raise, and dr tims waste away. I have not ID the dino, I dont really want to buy a microscope lol. Not sure what type exactly, but its dark brown, stringy, has airbubbles on some of them, mainly comes out with lights on, and has now spread to sand bed.
 
RAP

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Sounds like I did the same thing minus the temp raise, and dr tims waste away. I have not ID the dino, I dont really want to buy a microscope lol. Not sure what type exactly, but its dark brown, stringy, has airbubbles on some of them, mainly comes out with lights on, and has now spread to sand bed.
Getting the microscope is smart since there are so many different types, one that enters the water column at night so it can get hit by UV and then there is one that doesn't go to water, stay in the sandbed.

Diatoms can look like Dinos and also have airbubbles trapped in the snot, confusing reefers. I had this in one tank and dinos in the other.

I did a cheap microscope but need the better one to take better video.
 

vetteguy53081

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Dinoflagellates are protists organisms -those that do not fit within the three natural kingdoms: animalia, plantae or fungus- with ability to move with rotating movements. All dinoflagellates have the common feature of having two flagella located at right angles allowing them to perform such rotational movement which makes them easily recognizable (although some species such as the genus symbiodinium they are virtually immobile).
There are about 2.400 species which have a highly variable size ranging from 20 and 300 µm in the most common ones and up to 2 mm in the case of species such as noctiluca. In the marine aquarium species are usual smaller as symbiodinium and Amphidinium, While some like ostreopsis are large and can be seen without a microscope (with good lighting and visual acuity).
The problem arises when conditions in the aquarium break the biological balance and some dinoflagellate species spread uncontrollably, smothering the rest of the aquarium inhabitants. If the dinoflagellate species in question has the ability to produce toxins (usual in ostreopsis, gambierdiscus and prorocentrum to name a few)
The problem often arises when we try to bring cleanliness it to the limit, in order to improve its appearance and color of corals.
They tend to occur suddenly when the aquarium water reaches an extraordinary cleanliness, in which most microorganisms perishes for lack of food. With no other organisms that can stop them, this type of dinoflagellate can multiply so fast that when we realize it's late and we will find an aquarium full of brown and ochre slime suffocating fish and invertebrates. These dinoflagellates possess chloroplasts enabling them to synthesize their own food even under a minimal amount of light. Some species can form cysts called pellicles which allow them to remain in the aquarium for months although we have completely sterilized or kept in complete darkness. Once the light or the right conditions come back, they will reappear and thus problems.
Most of these dinoflagellates have a very curious behavior, typical of pathogens and parasites. With the presence of light they secrete mucus which adhere to any surface, including algae, coral and fish. They spend hours synthesising food and extending vertically in search of the light source (if we turn off the pumps in the aquarium we can see brown filaments grow towards the surface). When the light source disappears and can no longer synthesize food, it begins to diminish to none.
Here is full program to clean up:
Prepare by starting with a water change and blow this stuff loose with a turkey baster and siphon up loose particles.
Turn lights off (at least white and run blue at 10-15%) for 5 days and at night dose 1ml of hydrogen peroxide per 10 gallons for all 5 nights. If you dont have light dependent coral- turn all lights off.
During the day dose 1ml of liquid bacteria (such as bacter 7) per 10 gallons.
Clean filters daily and DO NOT FEED CORAL FOODS OR ADD NOPOX as it is food for dinos.
Day 5,, you can start with blue lights - ramping up and work your white lights up slowly
 

Micro-Reefs Aquarium

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Dinoflagellates are protists organisms -those that do not fit within the three natural kingdoms: animalia, plantae or fungus- with ability to move with rotating movements. All dinoflagellates have the common feature of having two flagella located at right angles allowing them to perform such rotational movement which makes them easily recognizable (although some species such as the genus symbiodinium they are virtually immobile).
There are about 2.400 species which have a highly variable size ranging from 20 and 300 µm in the most common ones and up to 2 mm in the case of species such as noctiluca. In the marine aquarium species are usual smaller as symbiodinium and Amphidinium, While some like ostreopsis are large and can be seen without a microscope (with good lighting and visual acuity).
The problem arises when conditions in the aquarium break the biological balance and some dinoflagellate species spread uncontrollably, smothering the rest of the aquarium inhabitants. If the dinoflagellate species in question has the ability to produce toxins (usual in ostreopsis, gambierdiscus and prorocentrum to name a few)
The problem often arises when we try to bring cleanliness it to the limit, in order to improve its appearance and color of corals.
They tend to occur suddenly when the aquarium water reaches an extraordinary cleanliness, in which most microorganisms perishes for lack of food. With no other organisms that can stop them, this type of dinoflagellate can multiply so fast that when we realize it's late and we will find an aquarium full of brown and ochre slime suffocating fish and invertebrates. These dinoflagellates possess chloroplasts enabling them to synthesize their own food even under a minimal amount of light. Some species can form cysts called pellicles which allow them to remain in the aquarium for months although we have completely sterilized or kept in complete darkness. Once the light or the right conditions come back, they will reappear and thus problems.
Most of these dinoflagellates have a very curious behavior, typical of pathogens and parasites. With the presence of light they secrete mucus which adhere to any surface, including algae, coral and fish. They spend hours synthesising food and extending vertically in search of the light source (if we turn off the pumps in the aquarium we can see brown filaments grow towards the surface). When the light source disappears and can no longer synthesize food, it begins to diminish to none.
Here is full program to clean up:
Prepare by starting with a water change and blow this stuff loose with a turkey baster and siphon up loose particles.
Turn lights off (at least white and run blue at 10-15%) for 5 days and at night dose 1ml of hydrogen peroxide per 10 gallons for all 5 nights. If you dont have light dependent coral- turn all lights off.
During the day dose 1ml of liquid bacteria (such as bacter 7) per 10 gallons.
Clean filters daily and DO NOT FEED CORAL FOODS OR ADD NOPOX as it is food for dinos.
Day 5,, you can start with blue lights - ramping up and work your white lights up slowly
Do you recommend ID'ing your Dino? I purchased a cheap $19 dollar microscope from Target to get a visual and try to video it using my phone, I did my best and think I might have amphidinium dino, but not sure.

Can you recommend a good microscope I can order on Amazon? I would like to keep one for future ID, I am sure this is going to come back with different strands.

Tomorrow I take back the cheap plastic microscope waste of $19 bucks plus batteries. LOL
 

vetteguy53081

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Do you recommend ID'ing your Dino? I purchased a cheap $19 dollar microscope from Target to get a visual and try to video it using my phone, I did my best and think I might have amphidinium dino, but not sure.

Can you recommend a good microscope I can order on Amazon? I would like to keep one for future ID, I am sure this is going to come back with different strands.

Tomorrow I take back the cheap plastic microscope waste of $19 bucks plus batteries. LOL
Identifying type is good to know as they have contributors . As for microscope, follow reviews and best performance ratings
 
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To fix dino
*stop water changes
* stop carbon dosing ,gfo or any nitrate and phosphate removing agent
* raise phosphates and/or nitrates if undetectable
*don't do a black out or turn off skimmer.
Grab a 5 micron sock 5 gal bucked and a pump to pump water back into the tank.
Siphon water out of tank through sock into bucket and pump water back in the tank. This will remove the dino. May have to do this a few times.

Get ready for a plague of gha. Don't use gfo or phosphates nitrate removal agent. Greatly increase cuc.
Thats how I beat mine.
 

attiland

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I been having Dino’s in my main tank, but have been using microbacter clean. It works great but not a overnight fix. Make sure you follow the bottle directions exactly. Make sure you vacuum off the rocks or sand bed when you see them. Do this durning the day, as at night they disappear into the water stream. I also do two 30% water changers every 8 days. Change your filter socks every day. Make sure you clean out your sump also. Also a UV light make a great difference.
microbacter7 will not help at this point. Good luck, will take a couple weeks or more.
If you have read the Dino tread you know the strains go to the water column can be successfully controlled by correctly sized and plumbed UV.
If not read it do it now. Plenty to learn
https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/dinoflagellates-–-are-you-tired-of-battling-altogether.293318/
 

attiland

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To fix dino
*stop water changes
* stop carbon dosing ,gfo or any nitrate and phosphate removing agent
* raise phosphates and/or nitrates if undetectable
*don't do a black out or turn off skimmer.
Grab a 5 micron sock 5 gal bucked and a pump to pump water back into the tank.
Siphon water out of tank through sock into bucket and pump water back in the tank. This will remove the dino. May have to do this a few times.

Get ready for a plague of gha. Don't use gfo or phosphates nitrate removal agent. Greatly increase cuc.
Thats how I beat mine.
This is the story of cleaning up but there is an important bit missing in my opinion and that is introducing competition by mud/new pcs of live rocks/ bacterial products like
Fauna Marin Bacto Reef ReBiotic
 

Micro-Reefs Aquarium

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Identifying type is good to know as they have contributors . As for microscope, follow reviews and best performance ratings
Thanks,

If you get a chance can you try to ID my dino?
 

attiland

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Do you recommend ID'ing your Dino? I purchased a cheap $19 dollar microscope from Target to get a visual and try to video it using my phone, I did my best and think I might have amphidinium dino, but not sure.

Can you recommend a good microscope I can order on Amazon? I would like to keep one for future ID, I am sure this is going to come back with different strands.

Tomorrow I take back the cheap plastic microscope waste of $19 bucks plus batteries. LOL
Get an analogue 500x-1000x magnification one. Go on eBay and a second hand one will do. Besser has really good ones. Should cost you around £30-40
 
RAP

bumpyj38

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Do you recommend ID'ing your Dino? I purchased a cheap $19 dollar microscope from Target to get a visual and try to video it using my phone, I did my best and think I might have amphidinium dino, but not sure.

Can you recommend a good microscope I can order on Amazon? I would like to keep one for future ID, I am sure this is going to come back with different strands.

Tomorrow I take back the cheap plastic microscope waste of $19 bucks plus batteries. LOL
I just started my fight against Dinos but from what I understand, you need to Identify them first. There are many different kinds and each one responds to things differently. For example, ostreopsis responds to UV because it moves into the water column at night. Others do not respond at all because it moves into the rock work and substrate.
To identify, you need a microscope of at least 400x. This is usually a 10x eye piece and a 40x lense giving you the 400x. Take pictures through the microscope (your phone will work). Also take a video because the movement of the Dino can help identify it. They move in different ways.
Another reason it is critical to ID with a microscope is because they are often mistaken with chrysophytes and diatom blooms which can also look snotty and have bubbles but are not Dinos at all. Good luck.
 

Micro-Reefs Aquarium

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Get an analogue 500x-1000x magnification one. Go on eBay and a second hand one will do. Besser has really good ones. Should cost you around £30-40
Thank you! Did you see he best I could do with a $19 dollar microscope from kids section at Target? I think they are the amphinium dinoflagellates simply because at night when the lights turn off, the sand bed looks like they are gone and then in the day when the lights fire up at the highest setting at 12pm they are very strong on the sand bed only.

I will get the better microscope by Amazon, thanks for the suggestion.
 

Micro-Reefs Aquarium

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Get an analogue 500x-1000x magnification one. Go on eBay and a second hand one will do. Besser has really good ones. Should cost you around £30-40
I did my best for today with what Target had in the toy section I am ordering one from Amazon, a nice one I can grow with and help others as I know dinos will come back.
 

attiland

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Thank you! Did you see he best I could do with a $19 dollar microscope from kids section at Target? I think they are the amphinium dinoflagellates simply because at night when the lights turn off, the sand bed looks like they are gone and then in the day when the lights fire up at the highest setting at 12pm they are very strong on the sand bed only.

I will get the better microscope by Amazon, thanks for the suggestion.
Wait with the conclusion but if this is Amphidinium than read about my fight here. https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/the-heater-failure-build.783559/post-8323630

also here is some help with the id
 

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wareagle

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I am with you also in this fight, I just diagnosed one of my systems to have Dinos, I did the coffee filter test. I started yesterday, I purchased equal to Microbacter 7 and read article to raise my temps from 77-78F to 81-82F so I am up to 82 degrees. You can read about it on the forums and youtube, I read a lot before I pulled the trigger.

What I have noticed and this is my opinion, is that my dinos exploded in the increase of the temp and the Micro-bacter 7, I feel it's metabolism is running higher in the warmer water and it will exhaust what ever it is taking on in my tank.

I will let you know as I progress to day #3.

Have you done the microscope ID?

I have posted 3 videos of hoping someone can ID the Dino I have.
You need to identify what you have before starting any treatment, and know the consequences of a mistake. Two different species of Ostreopsis
The optimal temperature ranges which gave growth rates of >90 % of maximal growth rate of each strain were 22–25 °C for Ostreopsis sp. 1 and 24–30 °C for Ostreopsis sp. 6
They're specialist at getting phosphate
The increase in both PMEase and PDEase activities indicates that the Ostreopsis-mat community
can utilize a wide range of DOP types. Tests in laboratory confirmed that O. cf. ovata can utilize both
phosphomonoester (D-Fructose 1,6-disphosphate, β-Glycerophosphate, α-D-Glucose 1-phosphate, Guanosine
5’-monophosphate and Phytic acid) and phosphodiester (DNA and RNA) sources to grow.
The experiments also demonstrated that PMEase and PDEase were strongly influenced by water temperature,
with maximum values recorded at 30-35 °C.
Based on the present findings, O. cf. ovata seems to have adaptations that allow it to thrive in P-limited
environments where organic P is the main source of P, as long as water temperature is high enough to maintain
elevated PMEase and PDEase activities
Save your money and treat your tank properly by finding out what have, then do the research to get rid of it.
 
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