Do colorful corals mean you have stressed corals?

BRS

Do you believe that some of our corals produce the best colors when stressed in our tanks?

  • YES

    Votes: 71 12.6%
  • NO

    Votes: 225 39.9%
  • NOT SURE

    Votes: 211 37.4%
  • MAYBE

    Votes: 51 9.0%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 6 1.1%

  • Total voters
    564

revhtree

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This thread got me thinking about the crazy colors of corals we have in our reef tanks and especially those, Easter like, pastel colors we see in acropora. Some of the colors we see is because we use particular settings on our lights to bring out or be able to "see" those colors, aka blue lighting. But in the following video, looking at corals in the wild, the discussion is geared at coral bleaching and how the response of the corals to this bleaching is producing coral colors like they have never seen before. So what about it our tanks?

Watch the video and let's talk about it!

1. Do you believe that some of our corals produce the best colors when stressed in our tanks?

2. What are ways we as hobbyists may be "unknowingly" stressing corals to produce better color?


**Disclaimer: You should not stress your corals for better color**

04.jpg
 
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Just John

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Some of my corals are definitely much brighter when stressed or irritated in some way. We may automatically think of water quality or lighting here, but it's not the only type of stress involved. For example, I have a dark green rhodactis mushroom that turns a very vibrant green when stressed by changes in water flow, something touching it, etc. I also have some Pink Diamond zoas. A couple of them got damaged recently and began to melt very slowly for perhaps 3 weeks. Their color was an incredibly bright pink as they slowly shrank. The brightest pink I have ever seen on any coral.
 
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revhtree

revhtree

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Very cool video too.
 

Charles Zinn

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This thread got me thinking about the crazy colors of corals we have in our reef tanks and especially those, Easter like, pastel colors we see in acropora. Some of the colors we see is because we use particular settings on our lights to bring out or be able to "see" those colors, aka blue lighting. But in the following video, looking at corals in the wild, the discussion is geared at coral bleaching and how the response of the corals to this bleaching is producing coral colors like they have never seen before. So what about it our tanks?

Watch the video and let's talk about it!

1. Do you believe that some of our corals produce the best colors when stressed in our tanks?

2. What are ways we as hobbyists may be "unknowingly" stressing corals to produce better color?


**Disclaimer: You should not stress your corals for better color**

04.jpg
You didn't mention the temperature swing of parameters for the beach. No quanatative ls guage
 

NoahLikesFish

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I think that it’s true, iirc coral don’t really experience super super super blue dim light in the wild thst would qualify as a blacklight and it might be depriving them of light
 

Renton

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I had an all blue jellybean frag that got very stressed from pally toxin (I was cutting them off the rocks) When it recovered a week later it had red streaks going through it and looked amazing.
 

DJF

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Yes- experienced it with an acantho that was getting too much light- it was displaying some great colors and started to have a glowing yellowish translucent mouth. Eventually it started to show signs of wear prompting me to move it. I saved it and it is happier but with none of those glowing “sos flares”
 

Mr_Knightley

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While I don't like the bright, pastel colors that bleaching or stressed corals produce, one of my sisters recently commented on my Acanthophyllia, who had bleached to neon pink after a temp spike, saying that she was in love with it. She was disappointed when I explained that is was actually sick xD I have noticed that closed up corals tend to be brighter, but that's just because the pigments are more concentrated when crumpled. Personally I like the more muted colors of happy, fluffy corals.
 

Shaina Carey

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While I don't like the bright, pastel colors that bleaching or stressed corals produce, one of my sisters recently commented on my Acanthophyllia, who had bleached to neon pink after a temp spike, saying that she was in love with it. She was disappointed when I explained that is was actually sick xD I have noticed that closed up corals tend to be brighter, but that's just because the pigments are more concentrated when crumpled. Personally I like the more muted colors of happy, fluffy corals.
I have a zoa. Just a boring little zoa, and I agree, lol. Would rather have happy dull coral, than bright stressed coral
 

Dragonsreef

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Typically fluorescent colors are a way to combat heat/excessive lighting. In the wild where temperatures are rising in the reefs corals cannot do anything about the temperature of the water but they can reduce their own temperature by reflecting more sunlight away from themselves by using flourescent colors.

I would consider it more of a defense mechanism or adaptation to a warmer/brighter environment than saying the coral is for sure stressed or less healthy than a duller coral. Its very possible for them to continue growing and living at the same rate as its duller version. In a tank where we can controll temp and lighting we can find that healthy balance where we get some brighter colors but arent pushing them near the point of bleaching. However bright flourescent colors and flesh starting to look transparent is an indication that its gone too far and would soon be a death sentence. Once the coral gets too hot or the light is too intense it will for sure bleach.

That being said i have definitely placed acros under some pretty intense light (up to 550-600par) to bring out more flourescent colors and have seen no negative effects in terms of growth or health.
 
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Jason Arego

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I have a big yellow submarine colony and when it was acclimating after entering my DT got these insane red slashes through the first quarter of the colony. It's like you took a small paint brush and just swiped All different directions. All new growth has no red slashes....

*Isolates it in a pico jar to tick it off more*
 

Calm Blue Ocean

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I got asking myself if it was possible that what we call "ideal parameters" could actually be designed to cause stress. But it seems to me that if that was true, we wouldn't have colonies growing enthusiastically and living long lives. Stress over time is generally detrimental to life. So, just guessing of course, I think most of the color we see in our aquariums is from us selecting for those colors, not forcing those colors.
 
BRS

Have you ever had aquarium equipment damaged by livestock?

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  • NO

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  • Maybe now that you mention it

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  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 3 1.3%
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