Life after velvet.

ChristieM

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So my newest tank had velvet and the very last fish, (there was only 3 but still sad), died. I loathe velvet with every fiber of my being. Now, I’m wondering what to do. I want to change the substrate anyway so I thought I would chick the old and start new, change the filter/media and let it “cycle” for a few days and then put my two fish from QT in there. Question is, is that gonna be a disaster, does velvet live on the live rock without fish? Can I dip the rocks to kill any velvet left? Basically, where do I go from here. TIA
 

Wannabereefvet

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So my newest tank had velvet and the very last fish, (there was only 3 but still sad), died. I loathe velvet with every fiber of my being. Now, I’m wondering what to do. I want to change the substrate anyway so I thought I would chick the old and start new, change the filter/media and let it “cycle” for a few days and then put my two fish from QT in there. Question is, is that gonna be a disaster, does velvet live on the live rock without fish? Can I dip the rocks to kill any velvet left? Basically, where do I go from here. TIA
Is it FOWLR or a reef?

if it’s FOWLR and no inverts I would run copper for two weeks, then add fish. No reason to rush and risk it.

If it’s a reef, just maintain your corals for 30-40 days without adding fish or any medications. That way if there’s any secondary parasites like ich or anything else, it will all be dead by then. I’d recommend running UV when you’re ready for fish too. Can’t hurt
 
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ChristieM

ChristieM

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Is it FOWLR or a reef?

if it’s FOWLR and no inverts I would run copper for two weeks, then add fish. No reason to rush and risk it.

If it’s a reef, just maintain your corals for 30-40 days without adding fish or any medications. That way if there’s any secondary parasites like ich or anything else, it will all be dead by then. I’d recommend running UV when you’re ready for fish too. Can’t hurt
FOWLR. No inverts either. I took them out to treat for velvet. I was going to grab a UV sterilizer this weekend. My only concern with the copper is I was told that when you treat with copper it can leach out from the LR for quite a while afterward. Not sure if that’s correct or not. Forgot to mention Ph 8.2, Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, and Nitrate ..25
 
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Jay Hemdal

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FOWLR. No inverts either. I took them out to treat for velvet. I was going to grab a UV sterilizer this weekend. My only concern with the copper is I was told that when you treat with copper it can leach out from the LR for quite a while afterward. Not sure if that’s correct or not. Forgot to mention Ph 8.2, Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, and Nitrate ..25
Just adding in here - a UV sterilizer won't help kill the tomonts in the gravel sand and rocks. There is some discussion regarding how long a tank needs to remain fishless to be rid of protozoan diseases - 45 days at 81 F. is the minimum I use, but I've heard people going as long as 85 days (that's excessive though).

If the tank is empty, what about sterilizing it with hydrogen peroxide and then letting it lay fallow while you reestablish the biofilter?

Jay
 
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Wannabereefvet

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FOWLR. No inverts either. I took them out to treat for velvet. I was going to grab a UV sterilizer this weekend. My only concern with the copper is I was told that when you treat with copper it can leach out from the LR for quite a while afterward. Not sure if that’s correct or not. Forgot to mention Ph 8.2, Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, and Nitrate ..25
That is absolutely true, copper will be absorbed by the rock, and I have no clue when/if that rock stops pushing copper back out into the water. That also happens with phosphates and other things that we don’t want/don’t want too much of.

That being said, as long as you have a Hanna checker for copper and are careful, I wouldn’t worry too much about it. Some sensitive fish might have an issue with the toxicity of it long term, but for the most part as long as the levels are low after your treatment you should be fine.

i would just stick with very hardy fish to start, rabbitfish, and other heavy bodied fish that way you have a little wiggle room with the fish themselves while you observe and figure out what your tank is doing post treatment.
 
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nkarisny

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That is absolutely true, copper will be absorbed by the rock, and I have no clue when/if that rock stops pushing copper back out into the water. That also happens with phosphates and other things that we don’t want/don’t want too much of.

That being said, as long as you have a Hanna checker for copper and are careful, I wouldn’t worry too much about it. Some sensitive fish might have an issue with the toxicity of it long term, but for the most part as long as the levels are low after your treatment you should be fine.

i would just stick with very hardy fish to start, rabbitfish, and other heavy bodied fish that way you have a little wiggle room with the fish themselves while you observe and figure out what your tank is doing post treatment.
fox face are the first to die w me w velvet
 
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