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Metcho

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Yes it is correct. I had to re draw it in a way I could understand it. (I am an electrician) I wasn't sure what you were trying to do and I was reading it backwards.
Okay I greatly appreciate your input with this project.

One last thing before I build it. Do you think the one power supply would power all three pumps without a problem? I’ll provide pic of new power supply I’m looking at using

it’s replacing two ac to dc power adapter
Input 100-240v~50/60
Output 24v1.75a

and one ac to d. Power adapter
Input 100-240v ~ 50/60
Output 24v = 2.75a

I chose this new power ac to dc power supply cause it equals the total amps I’m replacing with the old three power supply’s.

786B044F-EF09-49FF-86D5-1A16858DE1A3.png
 

Paul B

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It should power what you want no problem.
 

Metcho

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It should power what you want no problem.
One last question do you think I need to put fuse before he batter into relay or to each + dc jack going back to the controllers like 3a fuse one 2.75a one and 2a fuses on the other two that were 1.75a or no need for fuses?

thanks Metcho
 

Paul B

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It's up to you but not necessary. The low voltage parts are in the water and no harm will come if they short out except they will not work any more.
 

Metcho

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It's up to you but not necessary. The low voltage parts are in the water and no harm will come if they short out except they will not work any more.
Okay thanks. It was just like making sure they blew before my pumps.
 

JumboShrimp

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Greetings... I need some very “basic” information (for my very “basic” brain to comprehend :p ):

Assuming a wall of standard home outlets running to a standard home’s electrical box, I’d like to know what amount of equipment I can safely plug in without tripping the fuse. All the equipment is in “watts” (pump, heater, lights, wave makers, etc.)— how do I add up all the wattage and know what impact that has on a 15 amp fuse (which I assume is standard)? Thanks.. keep it :)simple for me!
 

Sparkymarc

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Greetings... I need some very “basic” information (for my very “basic” brain to comprehend :p ):

Assuming a wall of standard home outlets running to a standard home’s electrical box, I’d like to know what amount of equipment I can safely plug in without tripping the fuse. All the equipment is in “watts” (pump, heater, lights, wave makers, etc.)— how do I add up all the wattage and know what impact that has on a 15 amp fuse (which I assume is standard)? Thanks.. keep it :)simple for me!
Add total watts and divide by volts (120v). That will give you total amps.
 
Lazys Coral House

Paul B

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"About" 1200 or 1300 watts. It's "about" because almost no one gets 120 volts because it varies due to a few factors but it is probably closer to 108 volts.

If you add more and it trips the circuit breaker, it's no problem and you will just have to remove something.

Is that simple enough or should I use wooden blocks with numbers and letters on them? :p
 

BZOFIQ

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Hello all I've got a question. I have three 24v dc pumps. All three power supply's have the same input 100-240v ~50/60. Only thing is two have output of 24V = 1.75A and one has 25V = 2.75A My question is can I use one power supply that's rated same input but output is 24V= 6.25A and eliminate three separate power supply’s ? I would be plugging the new power supply into a dc jack that would be soldered to three separate dc jacks returning to each of the three pumps via three controller. The pumps a jeboa dc pumps. Would the power supply work and split the Amps or not work?

thanks Metcho

That would work, Just get a power supply that's rated for about 8A. This way you're not taxing it and keeping it running cool. Im working on same solution with built in battery backup option using this.

 

BZOFIQ

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"About" 1200 or 1300 watts. It's "about" because almost no one gets 120 volts because it varies due to a few factors but it is probably closer to 108 volts.
108!?!

Thats low, I regularly see between 119 and 122 on all my APC units at home.
 

Paul B

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It depends on where you live. Here in New York I Just tested it and it is 125 volts. In Manhattan it could be 108 to 125. I was a Master Electrician there for 40 years.

It doesn't matter and not that important, like salinity. :)

If for some reason you want to be real accurate get yourself a digital Fluke meter (Like I just used) and test it. But if you use the exact wattage of your circuit breaker, it will eventually trip because it will get hot.

Also remember that those 6 or 8' extension cords you get in a hardware stores or Home Depot will not carry that amount of watts and will get very hot or burn so this is only for plugging directly into the outlet.
Those cords will only carry about 10 amps or 1000 watts or less.

They are rated a little higher but they are made in China and will get hot if you use them for the power they are rated for so it is safer to use less.

All measurements in electricity are "about" because there are a lot of things to figure in just like dosing a reef tank. We have to figure types of corals, salinity temperature etc.

Electricity also will vary due to temperature and more important length of wire or type of insulation.

How many wires are next to each other, how many neutrals are used. You can really get crazy and figure capacitance, reactance etc.

Just forget about all that and use less wattage than any electrical equipment is rated for. :cool:
If it says 1000 watts, use like 850 watts or less. Stay safe. :)
 

BZOFIQ

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I agree Paul on points made.

I'm in Staten Island and since I have a tendency to overbuild with big margins for safety I always plan for multiple circuits at half (or less) load rather than being near the theoretical ceiling.

Re extension cords; I tend to stay away from them. If needed, Home Depot has really really great 12 Gauge extensions by RIGID with very thick silicone-like insulation. They are pricey but its the only type I plug into the garage when using equipment outside.

That said, I do own a Fluke and use it regularly. They make great multimeters.
 

infinite0180

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You can not share the neutral from two circuits using a mini breaker. Only if the circuits are on different phases, and they are not with a mini breaker.

Now even if the circuits are on different phases some codes forbid it. (but I don't listen to that and share it anyway like we did since electricity was invented. But don't tell anyone. )
hey,

i just stumbled upon this today and i realized my newly purchased/renovated house has one of these multi wire branch circuits. Im in the process of adding a dedicated 20 amp circuit for my tank so i have my panel open for inspection. My 2nd floor is fed by a single 14/3 with ground wire from the panel. They used 2 separate 15 amp breakers. They are stacked on each other so on different legs. After reading these comments i did a bit of research and learned how somebody could be shocked when working on these types of circuits if both breakers are not off. I then remembered i myself had done that on this circuit but luckily did not get shocked. I would like to correct this issue and have it set up properly. i read to use a double pole breaker which ensures the circuit is on two separate phases and that when working on the circuit it will be completely shut off. Is this the right type of breaker to ensure that?

I guess the only other thing i want to understand about these double pole breakers is this: technically a double pole breaker is 2 times the amp rating that it states, right? So a double 15 is allowing 15 on each conductor? It does not limit both conductors to a total of 15 amps, right?

Thanks!
 

Sparkymarc

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hey,

i just stumbled upon this today and i realized my newly purchased/renovated house has one of these multi wire branch circuits. Im in the process of adding a dedicated 20 amp circuit for my tank so i have my panel open for inspection. My 2nd floor is fed by a single 14/3 with ground wire from the panel. They used 2 separate 15 amp breakers. They are stacked on each other so on different legs. After reading these comments i did a bit of research and learned how somebody could be shocked when working on these types of circuits if both breakers are not off. I then remembered i myself had done that on this circuit but luckily did not get shocked. I would like to correct this issue and have it set up properly. i read to use a double pole breaker which ensures the circuit is on two separate phases and that when working on the circuit it will be completely shut off. Is this the right type of breaker to ensure that?

I guess the only other thing i want to understand about these double pole breakers is this: technically a double pole breaker is 2 times the amp rating that it states, right? So a double 15 is allowing 15 on each conductor? It does not limit both conductors to a total of 15 amps, right?

Thanks!
You are correct. Each circuit will have 15 available amps. The 2 pole breaker is just to ensure that the 2 circuits sharing a neutral will both be shut down to avoid back feed on the neutral.
 

infinite0180

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You are correct. Each circuit will have 15 available amps. The 2 pole breaker is just to ensure that the 2 circuits sharing a neutral will both be shut down to avoid back feed on the neutral.
Great, ill pick one up next time im at HD and swap it out. Better safe than sorry. It probably would have been picked up on a home inspection but i waived that in order to stand a chance on this house. Slowly trying to go over everything...
 
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