Help !! Bubble tip anemone !!

BRS

saltlife97

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Okay so the past three weeks my Beautiful rose bubble tip anemone has Oddly only retracted its tentacles completely and has been almost puffed up and flat so it hasn’t been eating and I cannot get it to.. nothings changed in the tank and perimeters are all good , all other corals are thriving along with the two other rbta’s in the tank
Has anyone ever had this happen and will it recover it’s been like this for weeks and has not worsened or got any better on its own
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vetteguy53081

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Light seems bright. They do do respond well to bright light and/or high water flow.
Proper Bubble Tip Anemone care requires a bit of work to keep these creatures healthy! In short, we usually don’t recommend them for first-time aquarists. Having thorough knowledge about these animals is a must. The invertebrates are sensitive to water changes and require pristine conditions to stay in good shape. Failing to meet their needs can result in early death and damage to the tank environment as a whole. Yes, getting caught in a power head is a concern but rarely occurs. I have 6 (which time to sell a couple of them and none have ever left their spot in the tank.
The most important thing you’ll need to take care of before you bring your anemone home is perfecting the tank and water conditions. You should never place a Bubble Tip Anemone into a tank you just set up.
Take some time to get parameters just right and let the closed environment cycle for a few months. This ensures that conditions are stable and safe. Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quakity test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: Between 77°F and 82°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.4
  • Water hardness: 8 to 12 dKH
  • Specific gravity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to truly thrive because they’re photosynthetic. Basically, that means that they absorb light to make food and grow. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists agree that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your jets at the anemone. The creatures enjoy subtle movement at all times. But too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. twice a week feedings is ample.
 

blaxsun

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One of my RBTAs closed up similar (but not quite as withdrawn) to yours a few weeks ago. It turns out another BTA had its "foot" adjacent - and they both wanted to be in the same cave sticking out the back. Eventually the green one moved to another spot, the rose one retracted into the cave for a few days and popped out the back this morning. It's now stupid happy.

@vetteguy53081 has a lot of great suggestions!
 
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saltlife97

saltlife97

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Light seems bright. They do do respond well to bright light and/or high water flow.
Proper Bubble Tip Anemone care requires a bit of work to keep these creatures healthy! In short, we usually don’t recommend them for first-time aquarists. Having thorough knowledge about these animals is a must. The invertebrates are sensitive to water changes and require pristine conditions to stay in good shape. Failing to meet their needs can result in early death and damage to the tank environment as a whole. Yes, getting caught in a power head is a concern but rarely occurs. I have 6 (which time to sell a couple of them and none have ever left their spot in the tank.
The most important thing you’ll need to take care of before you bring your anemone home is perfecting the tank and water conditions. You should never place a Bubble Tip Anemone into a tank you just set up.
Take some time to get parameters just right and let the closed environment cycle for a few months. This ensures that conditions are stable and safe. Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quakity test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: Between 77°F and 82°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.4
  • Water hardness: 8 to 12 dKH
  • Specific gravity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to truly thrive because they’re photosynthetic. Basically, that means that they absorb light to make food and grow. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists agree that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your jets at the anemone. The creatures enjoy subtle movement at all times. But too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. twice a week feedings is ample.
Very helpful info to follow up on thank you
 
BRS

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