Let Me ID Your Wrasse!

Discussion in 'Fish Discussion' started by evolved, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2019 Partner Member Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    You guys nailed it!
     
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  2. Abhishek

    Abhishek Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Squad R2R Excellence Award

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    Well you learn a thing or 2 when you are around the master :)

    Regards,
    Abhishek
     
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  3. codydemmel4

    codydemmel4 Valuable Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Just got my wrasse today. All of them seem to be doing great besides this one, I can’t remember if this was the carpenter or mccoskers wrasse. Any help would be great on IDing it. I am waiting till I get home from work tonight to dose prazi to give them some time to relax in the QT.
     
  4. raccioppi83

    raccioppi83 Member NJRC Member

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    It won't let me post my picture :( I know what it is, but it's a good challenging one.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2018
  5. Radman73

    Radman73 Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    How many filaments are coming off it's dorsal fin? Gosh I hope that was all said correctly lol! Until an expert chimes in I'll take a guess that it's the Carpenter's.
     
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  6. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2019 Partner Member Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    Is it possible to get a better pic, particularly of the anal fin? It actually appears to be P. flavianalis.
     
  7. codydemmel4

    codydemmel4 Valuable Member

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    I will try to get a better picture when I get home (hoping he is alive) he was barely moving or swimming for the 30 minutes I was checking them out on my break.
     
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  8. codydemmel4

    codydemmel4 Valuable Member

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    Just a heads up if it helps more. I did not get a yellowfin flasher. It is either a mccosker or carpenter unless LiveAquaria gave me the wrong type of fish, I am starting to think it is the carpenter
     
  9. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2019 Partner Member Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    LA can misidentify fish...
     
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  10. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2019 Partner Member Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    It has more than one filament so it definitely isn't a mccoskeri.
     
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  11. codydemmel4

    codydemmel4 Valuable Member

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    haha yeah I figured they could and okay, I will get some better pictures later tonight :)
     
  12. Abhishek

    Abhishek Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Squad R2R Excellence Award

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    All mccoskeri I had over the years have single filament . So you are bang on target here .

    Problem is P.flavianalis have quite a lot of variations . I have seen with 1 or 2 filaments . So not sure if it can be identified based on just filaments .
    May be many I have seen in the past were wrongly ided .
    Am also interested in seeing a better pic and want to know how to correctly Id it .

    Regards,
    Abhishek
     
  13. townjas

    townjas Active Member

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    Nice fish. I have 1. They get more bluish and the spots move together to form rings as they transition.
     
  14. Abhishek

    Abhishek Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Squad R2R Excellence Award

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    Side note - question for @eatbreakfast .

    As I told earlier my blue star started transitioning into male without any companion . So it was a big deal for me !!

    During the transition phase which lasted around 12-15 days , he chased other anampses and Halichoeres females and was chased around by my male C.Solorensis .
    Once the transformation was over , everything calmed down in the tank as if nothing happened .

    It was such an amazing and odd behavior for me to witness as I didn't expect the transitioning male to chase other Anampses and Halichoeres although am not surprised that the solorensis male chased another male .

    Did you experience such behavior ?

    Regards,
    Abhishek
     
  15. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2019 Partner Member Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    It cannot be identified soley by filaments, though mccoskeri only ever has 1. Flavianalis can have 1-3, carpenteri has 2-4. The anal fin will be the determining factor between carpenteri and flavianalis.
    Yes. Transitional Macropharyngodon males can be quite aggressive toward other sand burying wrasses, though it can vary. Some aren't a problem, others are. In one case a transitioning meleagris killed 3 other Halichoeres wrasses that had been with it prior, but that case is an outlier.
     
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  16. Abhishek

    Abhishek Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Squad R2R Excellence Award

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    Take a bow @eatbreakfast ;Jawdrop . Your knowledge on wrasses is like an encyclopedia ! You should share what all species you keep currently and a few shots . Will be a learning experience for all of us !!!

    Regards,
    Abhishek
     
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  17. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2019 Partner Member Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    I have trouble taking pics, but the wrasses in my personal tank include:

    1 male and 1 female Anampses chrysocephalus. They were a group of 3 females that I had for the past 2 years. Last fall the second female began chasing the lowest female, but I wasn't able to catch her out before she perished, but then in January the dominant female disappeared for a few days and emerged as a transitional male. The transition lasted about 3 weeks. Now it is a full blown male.

    There are 2 female meleagris leopards. I bought them as a trio, but 1 didn't make it through qt.

    There is a male pintail and a male rhomboid wrasse that were both bought as females. The pintail is about 4.5 yrs old. It's colors have faded, but it is the biggest pitail I have ever seen.

    I have a Halichoeres iridis, chrysus, and melasmapomus.

    There is also a Cheilinus oxycephalus. This is such an under appreciated species. As long as a fish isn't small enough to be considered food they are incredibly peaceful and they have one of the best abilities of changing colors, going from a deep red to white with red markings to grey.

    Those are all the wrasses I currently have, but have kept quite a few species personally in the past, but also I take care of fish tanks professionally, so have first hand experience with most of the species in the trade.
     
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  18. codydemmel4

    codydemmel4 Valuable Member

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    [​IMG]

    This is the best I could get. I’m 90% sure it’s the carpenter wrasse but would like your guys opinion.
     
  19. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2019 Partner Member Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    Yup, carpenters wrasse. The red margin on the anal fin is the identifying factor.
     
  20. jimmyzhou

    jimmyzhou Well-Known Member

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    Got it form lfs few days ago told was lineatus is that right? Or the supermale
     
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