ORA Ultra Grade Crocea Clam

bizarro124

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I saw that Liveaquaria had some ORA Crocea clams in stock, but couldn't really find any pictures. They weren't on Diver's Den so I took a chance and bought an ultra grade.

First shot is from above under all LED channels at 40% so probably 9k-10k. Second shot is from the side and through a layer of algae. It's really poor quality, but I don't have the skills to take better photos.

I don't have any shots under blues since I don't have any way to filter out the blue, so I'll have to describe it. The teals look blue at a glance, but if you look carefully in person, there's a difference. The gold isn't quite as noticeable as well. From the side, it looks dark purple with blue specks.

For $139.99, I'm satisfied with the purchase. When I got it yesterday, it was more withdrawn, I thought it looked really similar to the stock photo for the first grade. I wasn't happy about it then lol.

Maybe this'll help people who are curious about making the purchase.

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minus9

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Great info thanks. I've read that bristle worms eat clams and my 5.5yo reef has them. Wish it didn't just for clams.
Bristle worms will not eat healthy living tissue/animals. If that were the case, then no one would have any corals or inverts in their tanks. They are detritivores by nature and serve a roll as the clean up crew of dead or dying matter. If there's one myth that needs to be broken, it's that of the bristle worm.
 

Lost in the Sauce

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Bristle worms will not eat healthy living tissue/animals. If that were the case, then no one would have any corals or inverts in their tanks. They are detritivores by nature and serve a roll as the clean up crew of dead or dying matter. If there's one myth that needs to be broken, it's that of the bristle worm.
I'm taking this and running with it in hopes against hopes that you're right.

I'm new to the hobby with an established tank. From the GiT go, I've always wanted a maxima clam. Everything I've read said no go as the BW would eat them flesh off.

Thanks for the knowledge backed by experience. I appreciate it.
 

minus9

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I'm taking this and running with it in hopes against hopes that you're right.

I'm new to the hobby with an established tank. From the GiT go, I've always wanted a maxima clam. Everything I've read said no go as the BW would eat them flesh off.

Thanks for the knowledge backed by experience. I appreciate it.
I have two maximas and one noae with a tank full of bristle worms. In fact, if you lift any one of the three clams in my tank you'll find a handful of bristle worms clinging to the base of their shells at no harm to the clams, they simply provide shelter for them during the day. The only time I've ever seen a bristle worm actively feeding on a clam, it was dead or dying and they were simply doing their job. Having kept invertebrates since the 80's, I've seen a thing or two in my time. ;)
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Sorry for the bad pic.
 

OrionN

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Agree with @minus9. BW are no problem. Lots of them in my tank and under the clams.

These are my ORA Squamosa, Gigantea, Maxima and Crocea. They are doing great. No problem. I got a wild caught Noae also doing great. I need a Derasa and then I would have a full house.
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JayLu

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Your clam is absolutely beautiful. I am one of those people who have had a lot of bad luck with getting new clams, but this post (along with all of the beautiful clam picture) makes me want to try again.
 
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minus9

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where do i find a clam like that one thats blue green!... my other half is demanding a clam and id love to stay with a smaller type like crocea but she wants blue.. and if i get one... might as well geta crazy one.. seem impossible to find today. plus its barebottom tank. @OrionN
Blue maximas are a good choice and probably a little cheaper than crocea. Find a LFS that carries ORA stock and they can order one for you. If not, there are a handful of online vendors that usually have cultured clams.
 
Maxout

Michael Gray

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Blue maximas are a good choice and probably a little cheaper than crocea. Find a LFS that carries ORA stock and they can order one for you. If not, there are a handful of online vendors that usually have cultured clams.
yea maximas are def easier to find.. but 12" clam i dont have a home for 12"..crocea from my reading is 6-7
 

minus9

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i wonder why im being told to stay clear from small ones lol
Because it's an old myth that needs to die fast. It was once thought that small clams required feeding , which is completely false. Tridacna's have the ability to filter feed, but it's not the main source of their energy/food, they derive nutrition from their mantle, driven by light. This is a very simplistic explanation, but you get the idea. Clams do best in full spectrum light, but are extremely adaptive to different lighting conditions, as long as they get enough to drive growth. Both my maximas were small when I got them, probably 2 1/2" and my noae, like Orion's, was larger, probably 4"? To really appreciate their full color, use a "day" spectrum (6500k to 10k) and you'll see all of their colors as they should be. Don't be afraid of small clams, in fact, it's really rewarding to watch them grow. They key to buying a clam is looking for new shell growth and a nice full mantle, with no damage to the foot/byssal organ.
Clams are like sps, once you get bitten, you can't stop.
 
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