Orphek Reef Daylight Plus Data

Dana Riddle

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Here's some spectral data on a 120cm (48") Reef Daylight Plus LED luminaire. Shown are overall output (taken at 30" from light), UV output, and infrared out (this is of particular interest since radiation at 740nm can be absorbed by Photosystem I's Pigment 700, thus preventing possible electron bottlenecks and damage to Photosystem II.)
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Dana Riddle

Dana Riddle

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Very interesting, Dana! Little visible red spectrum with high infrared in red.
I have a jig partially built for use on a 90-gallon tank I use for testing lights. Not sure how far this IR radiation will penetrate a water column (judging on attenuation of 840nm radiation, the 740 should be OK. There's plenty of data on absorbance of radiation by water, but these usually deal in scale of meters. We need data by inches.)
 

Flippers4pups

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I have a jig partially built for use on a 90-gallon tank I use for testing lights. Not sure how far this IR radiation will penetrate a water column (judging on attenuation of 840nm radiation, the 740 should be OK. There's plenty of data on absorbance of radiation by water, but these usually deal in scale of meters. We need data by inches.)
Is it scalable from meters to Inches?
 
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Dana Riddle

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Is it scalable from meters to Inches?
It could be done - crudely - and be linear with the scale available to me. One of those few times where it is actually easier to conduct the procedure using my spectrometer... I'll try to get this done soon and incorporate it into next month's presentation in Atlanta (and post here, of course.)
 

Flippers4pups

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It could be done - crudely - and be linear with the scale available to me. One of those few times where it is actually easier to conduct the procedure using my spectrometer... I'll try to get this done soon and incorporate it into next month's presentation in Atlanta (and post here, of course.)
Looking forward to seeing your presentation, Dana! Your Macna 2016 one is legendary! Good stuff! I still reference that one from time to time!
 

Jase4224

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Hi Dana, in the process of designing my custom Orphek or’s and wandering if I should add the 740nm LEDs. Is there any advantage adding these or would the real estate be better used by something else? I’m not understanding the role this 740nm has biologically for coral.

Cheers
 
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Dana Riddle

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Hi Dana, in the process of designing my custom Orphek or’s and wandering if I should add the 740nm LEDs. Is there any advantage adding these or would the real estate be better used by something else? I’m not understanding the role this 740nm has biologically for coral.

Cheers
The 740nm LEDs aren't absolutely necessary but could be of benefit if light intensity is near or exceeds the zooxanthellaes' saturation point. In this case, the 740nm radiation can be absorbed by Pigment 700 in Photosystem 1 thus potentially avoiding an injurious bottleneck of electrons between the two photosystems.
 

Jase4224

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The 740nm LEDs aren't absolutely necessary but could be of benefit if light intensity is near or exceeds the zooxanthellaes' saturation point. In this case, the 740nm radiation can be absorbed by Pigment 700 in Photosystem 1 thus potentially avoiding an injurious bottleneck of electrons between the two photosystems.
So when you say saturation point do you mean par? Intensity? Sorry I’m trying to wrap my head around this.

I’m going to use three bars on my 180gal, one blue and two daylights (basically) so I doubt I will achieve any saturation point. If I’m correct then the 740nm may not be of any benefit to me....?
 
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Dana Riddle

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So when you say saturation point do you mean par? Intensity? Sorry I’m trying to wrap my head around this.

I’m going to use three bars on my 180gal, one blue and two daylights (basically) so I doubt I will achieve any saturation point. If I’m correct then the 740nm may not be of any benefit to me....?
Yes - the saturation point is when increasing the amount of light will not increase the rate of photosynthesis - 300 to 400 PAR, more or less.
 
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Jase4224

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Yes - the saturation point is when increasing the amount of light will not increase the rate of photosynthesis - 300 to 400 PAR, more or less.
Ok that’s great info! So for me they are not necessary as I’m only using the three bars.

Thanks very much for taking the time to answer my questions, surely this will help others that look into the subject.

Cheers
 

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The amount of radiation reaching corals in the warm wavelengths (610-800) is so trivial here it has little metabolic value.

It's almost as absurd as running violet LEDs. Every white paper I've seen on the topic concludes that the only difference between cloro A vs cloro B spectral absorption (cloro A leans towards more violet) is it's used as a regulation mechanism for light intensity and zooxanthellae adaptation - has nothing to do with wavelength.

Manufacturers put these wavelengths in their lights as marketing gimmicks to differentiate themselves from competitors. Reefers then buy them and try to come up with a justification for their purchase. The best SPS tanks I've seen lately are run with black boxes and no wavelengths other than royal blue to cool white. The guys with the struggling tanks and stubby frag packs of SPS that never get bigger than 3" are running the technicolor lights with all the marketing.

I'm thinking of inventing a light that beams infra red and plays easy jazz at low frequency levels to help stimulate SPS growth. Has about as much scientific basis as justifying wavelengths < 450nm or > 600nm for coral growth.
 

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The amount of radiation reaching corals in the warm wavelengths (610-800) is so trivial here it has little metabolic value.
Are there no corals between 0 - 5 m depth ?

It's almost as absurd as running violet LEDs. Every white paper I've seen on the topic concludes that the only difference between cloro A vs cloro B spectral absorption (cloro A leans towards more violet) is it's used as a regulation mechanism for light intensity and zooxanthellae adaptation - has nothing to do with wavelength.
I do not know which white papers you have read - as I know - chlorophyll B does not exist in corals (in zooxanthellae)

Sincerely Lasse
 
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Dana Riddle

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@Dana Riddle in a old thread (I think it was the one about red light) we posted some measures of 740 nm penetration in an aquaria. If you can't find it I'll try to post it again.

Sincerely Lasse
I've got that info somewhere - can't find it. Please post yours if it's handy. Thanks!
 
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Dana Riddle

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Are there no corals between 0 - 5 m depth ?


I do not know which white papers you have read - as I know - chlorophyll B does not exist in corals (in zooxanthellae)

Sincerely Lasse
Found it! It would be of interest to see transmission of 740nm radiation.
1565202086782.png
 
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Dana Riddle

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The amount of radiation reaching corals in the warm wavelengths (610-800) is so trivial here it has little metabolic value.

It's almost as absurd as running violet LEDs. Every white paper I've seen on the topic concludes that the only difference between cloro A vs cloro B spectral absorption (cloro A leans towards more violet) is it's used as a regulation mechanism for light intensity and zooxanthellae adaptation - has nothing to do with wavelength.

Manufacturers put these wavelengths in their lights as marketing gimmicks to differentiate themselves from competitors. Reefers then buy them and try to come up with a justification for their purchase. The best SPS tanks I've seen lately are run with black boxes and no wavelengths other than royal blue to cool white. The guys with the struggling tanks and stubby frag packs of SPS that never get bigger than 3" are running the technicolor lights with all the marketing.

I'm thinking of inventing a light that beams infra red and plays easy jazz at low frequency levels to help stimulate SPS growth. Has about as much scientific basis as justifying wavelengths < 450nm or > 600nm for coral growth.
I debated if I should even respond to this. But for the record, I disagree.
 

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