Reef Delete is a New Way to Sterilize Aiptasia and Other Pests

Reef Builders

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Reef Delete is a creative new approach for the eradication of aquarium pests and parasites which doesn’t use any chemicals or injection techniques to get the job done. Unlike consumable solutions of kalkwasser, lye, paste or any number of potions that reefers have concocted to try and kill unwanted reef aquarium pests, the Reef Delete…
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Cell

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Man, this really seems like one of those tools everyone should have, like a par meter, but is too expensive to justify owning because once the pest(s) is eliminated, it is no longer useful.
 

IKD

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Any directions for use? Sounds like it needs to be underwater as the first step. Something like being “x” inches from the target and hold steady for “y” seconds.
 

KenRexford

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Man, this really seems like one of those tools everyone should have, like a par meter, but is too expensive to justify owning because once the pest(s) is eliminated, it is no longer useful.
I have to laugh at loud at this one. So, you think if you zap the aiptasia, all gone, then aiptasia won't ever come back?!?!? I mean, aiptasia is like traffic jams. They just always show up. Always.
 

ITCreefculture

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Any directions for use? Sounds like it needs to be underwater as the first step. Something like being “x” inches from the target and hold steady for “y” seconds.
Will vary between species. UVC (and light) works on the inverse square law. If you increase the distance by 2x you’ll get 25% of the dose so will need to increase the exposure 4x to compensate, in order to achieve the same fluence (dose of UVC).
Essentially as close as you can possibly get - but the beauty is you can’t overdose! So get trigger happy!
 

ITCreefculture

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It will still spit out its spawn. Nothing to see here. Move along.
Not the case so far as they have a very strange reaction, usually increasing their surface area during the first dose as if they like it! We’ve sampled water around and above during dosing and haven’t yet been able to detect any planula. Either way, you’re smashing it with high power UVC light. Any that are released are into the the path of essentially a death ray . They are going on to be toast.
 

ITCreefculture

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I have to laugh at loud at this one. So, you think if you zap the aiptasia, all gone, then aiptasia won't ever come back?!?!? I mean, aiptasia is like traffic jams. They just always show up. Always.
In the past yes.. maybe now..?! Well, we all keep buying corals and importing new pests but aip is just one of many species and issues that can be treated with Reed Delete :)
 

ITCreefculture

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Man, this really seems like one of those tools everyone should have, like a par meter, but is too expensive to justify owning because once the pest(s) is eliminated, it is no longer useful.
Could be the case but we’re always importing new coral, swapping frags and you can never ultimately sterilise everything. I think the community is going to come up with some really awesome uses! Especially for coral disease treatments…. We’re working on gathering data and best use practice at the moment.
 

IKD

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Not the case so far as they have a very strange reaction, usually increasing their surface area during the first dose as if they like it! We’ve sampled water around and above during dosing and haven’t yet been able to detect any planula. Either way, you’re smashing it with high power UVC light. Any that are released are into the the path of essentially a death ray . They are going on to be toast.
You mentioned first dose. Does this mean we would need to reapply the dose several times on a single target? If so, over what time period is that to be done?
 

ITCreefculture

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You mentioned first dose. Does this mean we would need to reapply the dose several times on a single target? If so, over what time period is that to be done?
Depends on the species, size and amount of time you treat it for (and distance, but that’s usually as close as poss!) small aips, cyano, flatworms, Small soft stuff usually one good 60-120s dose will do it.. but a few short ones over a few days is also enough to be leathal. The key is.. you can’t overdose!
 
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