ReefBum's 225G Peninsula Tank Build

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ReefBum

ReefBum

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Here are two 55 gallon drums. The one on the left is for RODI water and the one on the right is for fresh saltwater. I have a pump in the RODI drum that pumps water to the other drum where I mix up the salt. I also use these drums to change water out for my established 187 gallon tank. Auto top-off for both the new peninsula tank and the 187 gallon tank are drawn from the RODI drum.

Tank Plumbing pic 19.jpg


I also added some valves to the right of the drum used to mix up new saltwater (there is a pump inside this drum as well). So if I want to pump water back into the peninsula tank I leave the valves as is. If I want it to go to the 187 gallon tank I turn each one the other way.

Tank Plumbing pic 20.jpg


This is the plumbing I put in to return water from the saltwater drum to the Dreambox for the peninsula tank. And here is the last part of it that goes into the Dreambox.

Tank Plumbing pic 27.jpg


Tank Plumbing pic 29.jpg
Tank Plumbing pic 30.jpg
 
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Greg Gdowski

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Never fails. The best place in the room results in the most difficult plumbing because of a furnace or chimney. Nice work around. Bummer that the distant will add a lot of head on your return side. I had that same problem with my 90. The location of the new 220 is a little friendlier. Detail on the plumbing was very nice. Thanks for the build thread.
 
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Ok, shifting gears a bit, I decided to start this tank with live rock versus dry rock. I had a crap experience my only time starting a tank with dry rock, as I had one problem after another, including a diatom bloom, bacterial bloom, dinos and cyano. I also could not grow SPS like I had in my tanks started with live rock.

One big advantage with dry rock that was appealing is that you can take your time sculpting a cool aquascape. Another is there is less chance of pests hitching into the tank, although this did happen when I tried dry rock (they came in on rock attached to corals).

Nonetheless, the biodiversity that comes with live rock is awesome and it was the main reason I decided to use it for this tank. I also believe you have to wait longer before adding SPS to a dry rock only tank.

I read some good reviews about KP Aquatics so I decided to order 100 lbs of their live rock. They talked me into shipping it in water versus wet newspaper.

Live Rock pic 4.jpg


I was leery about having it shipped in water out of fear that more hitchhikers would survive the trip. But they said I could flush out any unwanted critters by dipping the rock a few times in water with very high specific gravity (1.035 to 1.040)

Live Rock pic 1.jpg
Live Rock pic 6.jpg
 
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Aquarium Specialty - dry goods & marine livestock
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When I unpacked the rock I discovered a ton of life crawling on it, including a bunch of brittle starfish and some crabs.

Live Rock pic 5.jpg


Live Rock pic 7.jpg


I did an initial dip in the high specific gravity saltwater, which flushed out some more brittle starfish and crabs as well as some pistol shrimp and a mantis shrimp.

I separated out the hitch-hikers I didn’t want in the tank, namely the crabs, pistol shrimp and mantis shrimp, and dropped them off at a local fish store the next day…..so nobody was rubbed out.

That night all of the rock was placed in the new system to start the cycle. And during the cycling process over the next week, I rinsed the rock two more times in saltwater with a high specific gravity to make sure other pests didn’t make the display their permanent home.

Live Rock pic 8.jpg


Overall, I could not be more pleased with the quality of this rock. There was a ton of biodiversity, beautiful coralline algae and even sponges. It was also very porous, a good thing since there was more surface area for the bacteria.

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DxMarinefish

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Ok, shifting gears a bit, I decided to start this tank with live rock versus dry rock. I had a crap experience my only time starting a tank with dry rock, as I had one problem after another, including a diatom bloom, bacterial bloom, dinos and cyano. I also could not grow SPS like I had in my tanks started with live rock.

One big advantage with dry rock that was appealing is that you can take your time sculpting a cool aquascape. Another is there is less chance of pests hitching into the tank, although this did happen when I tried dry rock (they came in on rock attached to corals).

Nonetheless, the biodiversity that comes with live rock is awesome and it was the main reason I decided to use it for this tank. I also believe you have to wait longer before adding SPS to a dry rock only tank.

I read some good reviews about KP Aquatics so I decided to order 100 lbs of their live rock. They talked me into shipping it in water versus wet newspaper.

Live Rock pic 4.jpg


I was leery about having it shipped in water out of fear that more hitchhikers would survive the trip. But they said I could flush out any unwanted critters by dipping the rock a few times in water with very high specific gravity (1.035 to 1.040)

Live Rock pic 1.jpg
Live Rock pic 6.jpg
wish i could get these in the UK :(
 

rtparty

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Ok, shifting gears a bit, I decided to start this tank with live rock versus dry rock. I had a crap experience my only time starting a tank with dry rock, as I had one problem after another, including a diatom bloom, bacterial bloom, dinos and cyano. I also could not grow SPS like I had in my tanks started with live rock.

One big advantage with dry rock that was appealing is that you can take your time sculpting a cool aquascape. Another is there is less chance of pests hitching into the tank, although this did happen when I tried dry rock (they came in on rock attached to corals).

Nonetheless, the biodiversity that comes with live rock is awesome and it was the main reason I decided to use it for this tank. I also believe you have to wait longer before adding SPS to a dry rock only tank.

I read some good reviews about KP Aquatics so I decided to order 100 lbs of their live rock. They talked me into shipping it in water versus wet newspaper.

Live Rock pic 4.jpg


I was leery about having it shipped in water out of fear that more hitchhikers would survive the trip. But they said I could flush out any unwanted critters by dipping the rock a few times in water with very high specific gravity (1.035 to 1.040)

Live Rock pic 1.jpg
Live Rock pic 6.jpg
This is one area where I fully understand the benefits of live rock and yet, I can't convince myself to go through with live rock again. I am not sure what is worse: the dry rock maturation process or the devils that live rock can introduce from day one.

My thought has been to do a pretty cool aquascape out of Caribsea rock but then order 20 or so pounds of LR from KP Aquatics. It would be much easier for me to only have to QT about 20 pounds compared to 100 pounds in the tank. I once dealt with a polyclad flatworm that devoured my CUC and I could not catch it.

But I absolutely dread the year plus and all the problems that come with dry rock. I am convinced if you start with dry rock you will encounter everything you said here...dinos, cyano, hair algae, etc. That stuff may actually be worse than what the LR can bring in.
 
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