Tell me about your Morays… especially they’re aggression with tank mates

Thomas Jedlicka

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thanks for the advice, at this point I’m pretty committed to an eel I just did my aqua scape around a PVC tunnel

I’ll just be careful with the tank mates there’s a big Convict Tang at my LGS I have my eye on I’d also really like grouper but most seem like they’ll out grow my 125

I’ve mainly been looking into the Yellow Head, Jeweled and the Golden Tail and there seems to be more anecdotal evidence in favor of the Goldentail being laid back compared to the others …. I’ll look into the 2 you mentioned
I had a jewel moray if thats what you mean and they are meanest eel species ive kept
 
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trvrstnk4837

trvrstnk4837

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I had a jewel moray if thats what you mean and they are meanest eel species ive kept

Gotcha, seen a yellow-head in person yesterday and scooped him up….. I also grabbed a small V-tail grouper so far they seem like buddies

8EFA1DBE-B4E7-4F10-9DB8-70C332488626.jpeg
 
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lion king

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The white eyed is the mildest of the fang tooth gang, and they are kind of comical, a definitely interesting an eel. The white eyed is likely the best choice for a 125g. The goldentail is the next mildest in comparison, then the jeweled, but even the jeweled in likely going to be too aggressive for a 125g. I would not even think about the yellowhead, will likely be very aggressive and kill everything you could keep in a 125g. Even the small fang tooths really need to be housed with more aggressive larger fish. If it were me I would do a white eyed and may be able to get away with some of the milder triggers that stay small, maybe a Rhinecanthus species, I'm not a real fan of the bluejaw, a very popular mild trigger, but they may also work. Maybe smaller tangs, like a mimic or bristletooth, the powered varieties would work but will likely be aggressive, the last fish added if you choose. Possible larger dwarf angels or the small large angels, although the small large angles have a hefty price for an eel snack. Which ever you choose their tank mates will have to have some attitude and heft, or one day they will become food. Damsels are always good choices for a fang tooth eel tank, they are elusive and tough, some may perish but many will live a somewhat long life, there are many varieties available today, some actually pretty nice. Even if you get a little guy, within 1.5 years or so they will be mature, and thats when the real fun starts. Don't listen to the bull, "keep them well fed"; nature is nature, and eels need a gorge/fast diet or they will not live long due to fatty liver disease. The goldentail would be the only other one I would consider. During your research, pay attention to how long the eel has been in the tank, and how big they are; along with tank size and tank mates.

Oh I guess you can ignore my post, since it looks like you got a yellow head, I'll leave it up for others to read.
 
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The white eyed is the mildest of the fang tooth gang, and they are kind of comical, a definitely interesting an eel. The white eyed is likely the best choice for a 125g. The goldentail is the next mildest in comparison, then the jeweled, but even the jeweled in likely going to be too aggressive for a 125g. I would not even think about the yellowhead, will likely be very aggressive and kill everything you could keep in a 125g. Even the small fang tooths really need to be housed with more aggressive larger fish. If it were me I would do a white eyed and may be able to get away with some of the milder triggers that stay small, maybe a Rhinecanthus species, I'm not a real fan of the bluejaw, a very popular mild trigger, but they may also work. Maybe smaller tangs, like a mimic or bristletooth, the powered varieties would work but will likely be aggressive, the last fish added if you choose. Possible larger dwarf angels or the small large angels, although the small large angles have a hefty price for an eel snack. Which ever you choose their tank mates will have to have some attitude and heft, or one day they will become food. Damsels are always good choices for a fang tooth eel tank, they are elusive and tough, some may perish but many will live a somewhat long life, there are many varieties available today, some actually pretty nice. Even if you get a little guy, within 1.5 years or so they will be mature, and thats when the real fun starts. Don't listen to the bull, "keep them well fed"; nature is nature, and eels need a gorge/fast diet or they will not live long due to fatty liver disease. The goldentail would be the only other one I would consider. During your research, pay attention to how long the eel has been in the tank, and how big they are; along with tank size and tank mates.

Oh I guess you can ignore my post, since it looks like you got a yellow head, I'll leave it up for others to read.

Your post is still much appreciated and I’ll proceed with caution for sure, like I said the two don’t seem to mind each other but they’re babies so I’m sure that doesn’t mean much

Could you elaborate a bit on the gorge diet? He happily took a silverside an hour after going in the tank, are you saying he should eat every day or should I skip days here and there

I’ve heard to feed everyday until they’re full sized but I have no way of knowing if that was reputable
 

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I always suggest starting your research in the wild to successfully keep a species long term in captivity, we want to incorporate certain aspects of they live in the wild. An eel has a metabolism which relies on a gorge/fast eating cycle, they gorge their meals, eating like pigs; then fast in between meals. In captivity we do this, by feeding their full on feeding days, then giving days in between meals. A youngster can be fed more frequently, but after initial acclimation you want to establish a routine of a break between meals. A yellowhead under a foot could be fed every other day, but not everyday. Once they have thickened up and over a foot you may want to move to twice a week. An adult would do best not be fed more than once a week. Fed them their full on feeding day, take some time and offer them food until they refuse, usully be just retreating into their dens. Allow them to become active, going into hunting mode before you offer them food again, give them some time hunting rather than to immediately feed again. Feeding in this manner is not only healthier for the eel, they also become more active and interesting. Due to their metabolism, feeding too often stores fat and causes fatty liver disease and death. If you are feeding silversides, use Hikari brand, they use a fish that does not contain thiaminese. Thiaminese is an enzyme that blocks vitamin B1, and this will also cause premature death, sometimes as soon as under a year. Check out some of my other threads on nutrition for predatory fish. Here's one I wrote abouts eels, but there are some better ones with tons of recommendations.

 
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trvrstnk4837

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I always suggest starting your research in the wild to successfully keep a species long term in captivity, we want to incorporate certain aspects of they live in the wild. An eel has a metabolism which relies on a gorge/fast eating cycle, they gorge their meals, eating like pigs; then fast in between meals. In captivity we do this, by feeding their full on feeding days, then giving days in between meals. A youngster can be fed more frequently, but after initial acclimation you want to establish a routine of a break between meals. A yellowhead under a foot could be fed every other day, but not everyday. Once they have thickened up and over a foot you may want to move to twice a week. An adult would do best not be fed more than once a week. Fed them their full on feeding day, take some time and offer them food until they refuse, usully be just retreating into their dens. Allow them to become active, going into hunting mode before you offer them food again, give them some time hunting rather than to immediately feed again. Feeding in this manner is not only healthier for the eel, they also become more active and interesting. Due to their metabolism, feeding too often stores fat and causes fatty liver disease and death. If you are feeding silversides, use Hikari brand, they use a fish that does not contain thiaminese. Thiaminese is an enzyme that blocks vitamin B1, and this will also cause premature death, sometimes as soon as under a year. Check out some of my other threads on nutrition for predatory fish. Here's one I wrote abouts eels, but there are some better ones with tons of recommendations.

Awesome info!

I read through your thread aswell I’m really glad you warned me about the chemicals in his food I grabbed San Francisco Bay brand silver sides at the LFS to feed him until I went shopping but I won’t give him any more

Human food it is, I’ll be hitting up the local H mart and resist the temptation to spoil him with too much food
2BE42BEF-1DFA-4EAC-AC61-7DCD71517616.jpeg
 
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trvrstnk4837

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The white eyed is the mildest of the fang tooth gang, and they are kind of comical, a definitely interesting an eel. The white eyed is likely the best choice for a 125g. The goldentail is the next mildest in comparison, then the jeweled, but even the jeweled in likely going to be too aggressive for a 125g. I would not even think about the yellowhead, will likely be very aggressive and kill everything you could keep in a 125g. Even the small fang tooths really need to be housed with more aggressive larger fish. If it were me I would do a white eyed and may be able to get away with some of the milder triggers that stay small, maybe a Rhinecanthus species, I'm not a real fan of the bluejaw, a very popular mild trigger, but they may also work. Maybe smaller tangs, like a mimic or bristletooth, the powered varieties would work but will likely be aggressive, the last fish added if you choose. Possible larger dwarf angels or the small large angels, although the small large angles have a hefty price for an eel snack. Which ever you choose their tank mates will have to have some attitude and heft, or one day they will become food. Damsels are always good choices for a fang tooth eel tank, they are elusive and tough, some may perish but many will live a somewhat long life, there are many varieties available today, some actually pretty nice. Even if you get a little guy, within 1.5 years or so they will be mature, and thats when the real fun starts. Don't listen to the bull, "keep them well fed"; nature is nature, and eels need a gorge/fast diet or they will not live long due to fatty liver disease. The goldentail would be the only other one I would consider. During your research, pay attention to how long the eel has been in the tank, and how big they are; along with tank size and tank mates.

Oh I guess you can ignore my post, since it looks like you got a yellow head, I'll leave it up for others to read.

If you don’t mind answering an unrelated question is there a reason not to get a blue jaw trigger? I plan on having soft corals and a Brittle Star and at least from what I read it seems like that would be the safest trigger but have you had a different experience?
 

lion king

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If you don’t mind answering an unrelated question is there a reason not to get a blue jaw trigger? I plan on having soft corals and a Brittle Star and at least from what I read it seems like that would be the safest trigger but have you had a different experience?

That's just a personal dislike, if you like them that may work, but they are wimpy and may not be tough enough to withstand a yellowhead. If you are doing corals, that likely the best trigger. The 125g is a tough tank to include fish with a fang tooth eel. To get fish large enough not to fall victim, and also ok to be housed in a 125g.
 
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That's just a personal dislike, if you like them that may work, but they are wimpy and may not be tough enough to withstand a yellowhead. If you are doing corals, that likely the best trigger. The 125g is a tough tank to include fish with a fang tooth eel. To get fish large enough not to fall victim, and also ok to be housed in a 125g.

Hmmm I’m picking up what you’re putting down, all in all this may have been an irresponsible impulse buy on my part

that said he’s still a little guy so for now I’ll just wait and see feed him properly and buy any other fish I get as adults

if it becomes an issue and he’s hurting my other fish then I’ll have to do some re-homing of them or him possibly in conjunction with a tank upgrade but I’ll cross that bridge when I get to it

Thanks again brother
 

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I’ve had my snowflake for about 6 years. I guess he’s probably full grown. In the midst of a feeding frenzy—he’ll bite anything that moves (including me…OUCH). Once, my purple tang swam in front of his face during feeding time. No more purple tang. They can’t see well and are driven by smell. I’m guessing the same thing happened to my pearlscale butterfly. I don’t think he wanted to eat them, they just were in the wrong place at the wrong time.
He lives in a tank by himself now.
 

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I have a yellow head (fibrilmented) around 18inches long, super well fed on a varied fish meat diet…. I wouldn’t trust it for 30 seconds in my reef tank or wrasse tank. I keep with with two smaller triggers, and had a blue hippo tang in with it for awhile. Thing is always looking to eat anything that will fit in its mouth
 

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I’ve had my snowflake for about 6 years. I guess he’s probably full grown. In the midst of a feeding frenzy—he’ll bite anything that moves (including me…OUCH). Once, my purple tang swam in front of his face during feeding time. No more purple tang. They can’t see well and are driven by smell. I’m guessing the same thing happened to my pearlscale butterfly. I don’t think he wanted to eat them, they just were in the wrong place at the wrong time.
He lives in a tank by himself now.
He took a chunk out of the Purple Tang? Wow that's surprising my PT is super quick even during feeding there's no way my Snowflake would be able to get anywhere near my PT.
 

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Yellowhead applies to three different species; G. fimbriatus, G. undulatus, and G. rueppelliae. Most of those sold are fimbriatus or the fimbriated moray, mine was an undulated; I've never dealt with rueppelliae. I'd be surprised if any moray can match how vicious the undulated I had was, but I've never worked with fimbriateds personally.
I had a fimbriated many moons ago... it was very aggressive. Very cool fish, but yikes. :0)
 

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He took a chunk out of the Purple Tang? Wow that's surprising my PT is super quick even during feeding there's no way my Snowflake would be able to get anywhere near my PT.
Grabbed it by the face and basically crushed his skull. Was kind of a sneak attack—got him from behind while the tang was facing the front of the tank feeding. IMO—large snowflakes are NOT fish safe.
 
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Grabbed it by the face and basically crushed his skull. Was kind of a sneak attack—got him from behind while the tang was facing the front of the tank feeding. IMO—large snowflakes are NOT fish safe.
Wow what size tank was that? I have a 18-20" snowflake in an 8' x 4' tank and like I said can never even get close to any of my fish before they dart off.
 

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Also, on 2 occasions he grabbed ahold of one of my fingers. Teeth are blunt but man are their jaws powerful! It did not feel good. Once was a careless mistake by me. The other was the same sneak attack while I was doing tank maintenance.
Haha same thing nearly happened to me, luckily, I'm part cat. Almost got me when I was re arranging corals.
 
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