damaged frogspawn from shipping

nanonøkk

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ok so i decided to order a frogspawn online for the first time and it said it had 4 heads

fast forward today when it arrived this is what i got no four heads of frogspawn and alot of tissue damage

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also i’m researching heavily on bjd so if anyone has any more tips with that i would appreciate that a lot i just wanna make sure correctly how to deal with it if it dose go down that road

everything in my tank is stable actually funny enough all my other frogspawns and hammers and stuff are growing really well i’m just wondering if i should dip it (i don’t have any) or leave it alone this is what it looks like currently or just do the antibiotic dosing that i’ve seen been being done for bjd

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nanonøkk

nanonøkk

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I personally would leave it be maybe lower light and flow to help it heal. Don’t jump to bjd just yet it isn’t that far goon yet.
ok that’s what i’m planning on doing because the area of the colony that has the damage is in lower light and flow compared to the rest

and yea i’m just wondering if anyone knows anymore information besides the dosing treatment for bjd
 
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ok that’s what i’m planning on doing because the area of the colony that has the damage is in lower light and flow compared to the rest

and yea i’m just wondering if anyone knows anymore information besides the dosing treatment for bjd
So far as I know, there are no Known treatments for bjd. There are some people working on different techniques to some degree of success.

I don't see a lot of tissue damage either, looks like shipping stress more than anything and the inflated pics look good. I would keep it where it is and monitor it.
 

Pistondog

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Bjd is accelerated by stress as stress weakens response to diseases or invaders.
Leave it alone to recover from travel and to acclimate to your tank.
 

vetteguy53081

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Its obviously upset, but not dying or BJD. You'll know jelly disease when you see it which can be siphoned with a 3/8" tube and offer a chance. Place this coral at about third level where it will receive moderate light and gentle water flow.
A few things about hammer and frogspawn . . . . . These coral are photosynthetic and therefore respond to UV strength and increase/reduction in lighting. One of the more important requirements for frogspawn is Placement. It is an overlooked element that contributes to the overall acclimation and sustainability of your frogspawn. Some hobbyists simply choose to, Put it where is looks best but to reduce the amount of strain on your specimen, you should ideally place it in an area of your tank similar to the area in which you found it when you purchased it or where there is moderate light.
Another consideration to account for during the placement of your coral is the amount of light it will be receiving. This decision should never be random; should never be haphazard. Although capable of doing quite well in a relatively large range of lighting levels, ideally, your Frogspawn Corals do best when provided a moderate amount of lighting, with many hobbyists finding success with an added bit, or partial, shading. Euphyllia (theyre a member of this group) do not enjoy direct high lighting. Keep in mind that the amount of lighting and the degree of water flow work hand-in-hand in sustaining healthy coral life and growth. Although technically capable of survival, Frogspawn DO NOT appreciate high or even moderately high flow. They will open much bigger in gentle flow, and will be able to grow into those beautiful serene tendrils that you see swaying within your habitat. (see my pic below- this was a size of a quarter a year ago and now 6"x4")
I cannot overemphasize the incredible importance of both lighting as well as placement. Never, ever haphazardly place your corals, select your lighting, or randomly pair different specimens or species within a tank, and just hope for the best. Remember, like any coral, Frogspawn Coral requires a very specific amount of lighting, and in this case, it’s not a whole lot. Unlike many other corals, Frogspawn Corals don’t require a whole lot of lighting. They are also 100 PAR, but even levels as low as 50 PAR will work well for this beautiful species.
o ensure successful acclimation, growth, and just overall, general health, your Frogspawn Corals prefer a moderate to strong water flow within your habitat. Interestingly enough, you can control the growth .If you want to look for a more contract compacted look, a higher flow will help you to achieve that. If you want a more extended, sway appearance from your Frogspawn, a low to moderate flow. Aesthetically, what originally drew hobbyists to this coral was its ability to serenely sway in the currents.
Frogspawn are not the most aggressive eaters. Broadcast feeding is typically the easiest, most effective approach. Additionally, if there is too great a flow, or if there are fish in your habitat that are aggressively harassing them, they’re just not going to eat. Even if they are able to successfully get the food into their mouths, they often quickly spit it back out--quick enough where they may not even be digesting any of the food. By trying to directly feed, you are much more likely to develop an algae problem from uneaten food accumulating in your tank than you are to find success in direct feeding.
Follow these simple steps and let it take its' course. Theyre easy enough to meet the care needed and yes, they do shrink in the evening. One test- Increase your lighting a little once they shrink, and within the hour, you will see them puff up again.

1619048019109.png
 
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nanonøkk

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So far as I know, there are no Known treatments for bjd. There are some people working on different techniques to some degree of success.

I don't see a lot of tissue damage either, looks like shipping stress more than anything and the inflated pics look good. I would keep it where it is and monitor it.
ok that’s what i was thinking i was just wondering if someone knew anything else besides what i’ve been seeing which is a lot of different things and actually there’s a lot of damage on the one polyp towards the back of it wasn’t inflated i would try and get a picture of it for you but it looks like all the tissue on that polyp started to recede probably during shipping
 
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nanonøkk

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Its obviously upset, but not dying or BJD. You'll know jelly disease when you see it which can be siphoned with a 3/8" tube and offer a chance. Place this coral at about third level where it will receive moderate light and gentle water flow.
A few things about hammer and frogspawn . . . . . These coral are photosynthetic and therefore respond to UV strength and increase/reduction in lighting. One of the more important requirements for frogspawn is Placement. It is an overlooked element that contributes to the overall acclimation and sustainability of your frogspawn. Some hobbyists simply choose to, Put it where is looks best but to reduce the amount of strain on your specimen, you should ideally place it in an area of your tank similar to the area in which you found it when you purchased it or where there is moderate light.
Another consideration to account for during the placement of your coral is the amount of light it will be receiving. This decision should never be random; should never be haphazard. Although capable of doing quite well in a relatively large range of lighting levels, ideally, your Frogspawn Corals do best when provided a moderate amount of lighting, with many hobbyists finding success with an added bit, or partial, shading. Euphyllia (theyre a member of this group) do not enjoy direct high lighting. Keep in mind that the amount of lighting and the degree of water flow work hand-in-hand in sustaining healthy coral life and growth. Although technically capable of survival, Frogspawn DO NOT appreciate high or even moderately high flow. They will open much bigger in gentle flow, and will be able to grow into those beautiful serene tendrils that you see swaying within your habitat. (see my pic below- this was a size of a quarter a year ago and now 6"x4")
I cannot overemphasize the incredible importance of both lighting as well as placement. Never, ever haphazardly place your corals, select your lighting, or randomly pair different specimens or species within a tank, and just hope for the best. Remember, like any coral, Frogspawn Coral requires a very specific amount of lighting, and in this case, it’s not a whole lot. Unlike many other corals, Frogspawn Corals don’t require a whole lot of lighting. They are also 100 PAR, but even levels as low as 50 PAR will work well for this beautiful species.
o ensure successful acclimation, growth, and just overall, general health, your Frogspawn Corals prefer a moderate to strong water flow within your habitat. Interestingly enough, you can control the growth .If you want to look for a more contract compacted look, a higher flow will help you to achieve that. If you want a more extended, sway appearance from your Frogspawn, a low to moderate flow. Aesthetically, what originally drew hobbyists to this coral was its ability to serenely sway in the currents.
Frogspawn are not the most aggressive eaters. Broadcast feeding is typically the easiest, most effective approach. Additionally, if there is too great a flow, or if there are fish in your habitat that are aggressively harassing them, they’re just not going to eat. Even if they are able to successfully get the food into their mouths, they often quickly spit it back out--quick enough where they may not even be digesting any of the food. By trying to directly feed, you are much more likely to develop an algae problem from uneaten food accumulating in your tank than you are to find success in direct feeding.
Follow these simple steps and let it take its' course. Theyre easy enough to meet the care needed and yes, they do shrink in the evening. One test- Increase your lighting a little once they shrink, and within the hour, you will see them puff up again.

1619048019109.png
thanks for all the info and it was more of asking for different advice like dips and stuff but thanks for telling me about the syphon it out i didn’t know you could do that thanks for the advice
 
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