QUESTION OF THE DAY Phosphates: Do you even EXPORT bro?

What method do you use to export phosphates? Choose all that apply

  • Chemically

    Votes: 300 46.3%
  • Naturally

    Votes: 401 61.9%
  • Mechanically

    Votes: 284 43.8%
  • Nothing

    Votes: 76 11.7%

  • Total voters
    648

revhtree

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Phosphates can be a pain the ole sump! Zero phosphates are no good but too much and you have a problem! Ewww algae! So let's talk today about how the masses are keeping phosphates under control!

1. Do you keep a steady eye on your phosphate levels?


2. What plan do you have in place, chemically, naturally or mechanically to export phosphates?

export phosphates.jpg
 
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Quietman

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Other than 10% weekly WC, I'm using NoPoX but seeing some limitations when nitrates are very low (3 ish) with my phosphates popping back up to .1-.2 ppm. Started adding Phosguard to see if that could help, but not exactly happy with that either so far. Giving it some time but also looking into perhaps Lanthanum Chloride for a more direct removal.
 

Millimylilly

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I’m having such a hard time with phosphates. I have a 80watt uv unit that I think makes it so no algae can reproduce but when I test phosphates they are super high! Like 3ppm high... how do I get them down to appropriate levels???
 

hyprc

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1) Yes (salifert)
2) ESV TE+ (2ml/day) carbon dose + Skimmer + Mesh Filter Sock! (also dose LoudWolf NaNo3 as needed cause those things drop no3 too, not just po4 - and low no3 is BAD!)

Edit: I should be clear, I target a range of .03-.07 po4 and 10 to 25 no3 relatively speaking for a mixed reef. I feed NLS pellet multiple times a day. Water change once a year... maybe?
 
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living_tribunal

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Phosphates can be a pain the ole sump! Zero phosphates are no good but too much and you have a problem! Ewww algae! So let's talk today about how the masses are keeping phosphates under control!

1. Do you keep a steady eye on your phosphate levels?

2. What plan do you have in place, chemically, naturally or mechanically to export phosphates?

export phosphates.jpg
I’m sure you came across the new optimal phosphate level thread judging by this post.

To answer your questions, and I hope this doesn’t cause any confrontation, is nothing really.

I test phosphates daily ensuring they are at the approximate range I want which is always ~5x N/P. In absolute terms, I maintain nitrate at .5 and phosphate at .1. I only use chaeto to ensure phosphates don’t go too high.

I primarily use carbon dosing to attack nitrates and end up having to dose about .01-.02 phosphate a day.

So no one gets upset at me referring research on the impact of phosphate deficiency on corals, other people have success at other ranges*

I’ve found the research to indeed be very impactful in my reef and maintaining a low N/P has led to much faster growth than I witnessed before.

 

TimCW

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Yes, I check phosphate with Hanna ULR Phospate checker. Currently mine are in the .02-.03 range.
I try and keep it in check with water changes, about 10% every 2 weeks and running a skimmer. I know the skimmer is for removing organics but some do contain phosphates. I did use Phosguard for a while and it helped. If they start to get out of hand I'll use it again.
I know some use GFO but that seems to strip the water of all nutrients. Not a good thing if not used with caution.
 

LC8Sumi

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Strictly out of curiosity (not trying to argue about any specific "ways"), why not? I feel like there is a story here. :)
It’s just a feeling, but I think if it is added at a wrong time and/or wrong amount / photoperiod, it can outcompete beneficial bacteria for ammonia and nitrite, and push/keep the tank in an imbalanced state, which might lead to dinos/cyanos ultimately. I also think it competes for trace elements with corals, and in some cases this could lead to growth/coral color issues. Or it competes with some type of bacteria that’s present in the system and corals feed on those. Might be a coincidence, but I’ve pulled mine after 3 years, and the skimmate is lighter now & corals have a deeper color. I’ve tried dosing no3/po4 before, but I think I still was mainly feeding the algae in the fuge with that approach.
 
Corals.com

If you don't keep your sand bed clean it will cause your tank to crash.

  • True

    Votes: 6 28.6%
  • False

    Votes: 15 71.4%
  • Other (please explain in the thread)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Not Sure

    Votes: 0 0.0%

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