Your Resident Electrician for all your electrical questions!

Discussion in 'Do It Yourself (DIY)' started by Young Frankenstein, May 12, 2012.

  1. Bthomas

    Bthomas Active Member

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    They were cleaned out pretty well when we replaced the led panels in them.
    What would testing the voltage tell me?
     

  2. defasum

    defasum Member

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    Thanks Brew12, so I can check the connections on the ceiling fan and not have to deal with the outlet? I'll get up there sometime this week and have a look. So I need to check and see if the ceiling fan is correctly grounded? Forgive me but I don't know much about electricity wiring.
     
  3. defasum

    defasum Member

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    Thanks Floyd,

    I have installed GFCI outlets before but the ones I had in the past only had one line coming from the box. This one had a two. so I checked which one had power with a multimeter and installed that one to the line side. Are you saying I could get away with removing the load side connection on the GFCI outlet or install both to the line side?
     
  4. Floyd R Turbo

    Floyd R Turbo Super Duper Member R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor Toys For Kids Sponsor Article Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    You can install both on the line side, and then only loads connected to the actual receptacle will be protected.

    If you didn't have a GFCI in there before, what they did was just connect the rest of the circuit downstream from the receptacle and in that case, all good. What you did by adding the GFCI into the series chain was protect the previously unprotected ceiling fan.

    If you look at most GFCI receptacles, there are load side and line side screw terminals, and then additionally there are holes in the back for load and line side. These are just like push-connect terminals, there's even a wire stripping gauge on the back telling you how much sheath to strip off. So just take the wires that you connected to the load side terminal and cut/strip and insert into the line side push connect, good to go.

    I wouldn't have advised that until you told me that it was a plain receptacle before. What that means is that nothing "downstream" from the GFCI was ever intended to be protected, so it doesn't have to be after you put the GFCI in either. If you didn't know that, further research would be needed of course
     
  5. JROD79

    JROD79 Member

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    The gfci should only protect the tank, all wires should be spliced and placed on the line side of the gfci
     
  6. defasum

    defasum Member

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    Just thought I'd give an update and thank the great people here whom are always willing to help.
    I rewired my gfci and ran both to the line side. all is working now
     
  7. JROD79

    JROD79 Member

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    They are typically called " in-use" covers, because you can have something plugged in while the cover os closed.
     
  8. JROD79

    JROD79 Member

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    If you are going to snake the wall " meaning fish the electrical lines with in the wall cavity" romex would be the easiest to work with. If you choose romex, it needs to be installed in a way where it is not subject to physical damage. Meaning you can not run it in living space, it would need to be installed witin wall cavities.
     
  9. Brew12

    Brew12 Electrical Gru R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Leader Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    Just keep in mind that you still have a ceiling fan with a potential issue. Just because it does not need to be on a GFCI means that it is ok for one to trip a GFCI. If the fan is older, you may just need to clean it to remove any electrical tracking to ground. Otherwise, if it were my house, I would change the ceiling fan out with a new one. These kind of issues can start house fires if they track to ground enough which is why there is a push to have everything in a house an combined AFCI/GFCI units.

    It is important to know your local codes. Normally wall cavities are allowed, but in some areas (like at least parts of Indiana) all home wiring must be run within conduit.
     
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  10. Brew12

    Brew12 Electrical Gru R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Leader Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    It would tell you if the problem is on the AC or DC side of the light fixture. That would help you determine what your options are to either fix these fixtures or for replacement.

    I have very limited time this week but I can help with this more next week if you still need help.
     
  11. JROD79

    JROD79 Member

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    I only know typical wiring of the National Electrical Code, but this is correct each and every state or town may have their own code for their jurisdiction. Great point! You should check with your local builing department to see if they have any paticular codes you should follow as a general question. Chances are they may allow you to do the work but may want the permit fees to inspect such work.
     
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  12. Clownfish2

    Clownfish2 Member

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    Brew12,

    Recently I installed 2 GFCIs near my 110 gal tank. These GFCIs are on separate circuit breakers. I put half the electrical devices on GFCI #1 and the other half of devices on GFCI #2.

    If a heater or pump leaks voltage on GFCI #1, would this voltage trip both GFCIs or only GFCI #1?
     
  13. Brew12

    Brew12 Electrical Gru R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Leader Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    It will only trip the GFCI that it is plugged into.
     
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  14. Bashful664

    Bashful664 Member

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    Are you still around for help? I have a very strange issue going on with my electric and have to get it fixed before we can get our tank.
     
  15. Bashful664

    Bashful664 Member

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    Are you still around for help? I have a very strange electrical issue happening that has to be fixed before we can install our tank. Thanks Sorry for the double post, can't figure out how to delete this one.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2018
  16. Brew12

    Brew12 Electrical Gru R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Leader Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    I can't help with the double post, but what electrical issue are you having? ;)
     
  17. pdisner

    pdisner Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone. Who is the electrician here ? I have a non-reef related question. Can I ask it here or only related info.
     
  18. Brew12

    Brew12 Electrical Gru R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Leader Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    Ask away! There are a few of us with electrical knowledge that keep up with this thread.
     
  19. pdisner

    pdisner Well-Known Member

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    Ok. Here we go. I installed a simple overhead light with a dedicated switch. The lights work sporadically and I have double checked everything and I have used a multi meter to check for power. I redid the connections and reposition the lights on the track. What do u think?[​IMG]
     
  20. Brew12

    Brew12 Electrical Gru R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Leader Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    To make sure I am clear. You started at a point with a hot and a neutral. You ran the hot through a switch to the lights. You ran the neutral directly back to the source. Correct?

    When you say it works sporadically, what exactly do you mean? Does it flicker? Does it light for a period of time then stop, then restart again?
     
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