A Suncoral Worth Saving?

gr8pretender

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Here is a photo taken today, from my coworkers tank below. My coworker bought this sun coral from one of our LFS a few weeks ago, they had discounted it because it looked on its way out. There is only one polyp left now. His parameters aren't 100% (although I read that shouldn't matter that much for NPS). Even so, I have been trying to help him out with his parameters (since I already have calc, mag, sodium bicarbonate, etc) because his corals in general weren’t really growing in general, so I’ve been helping him dose various chemicals. Anyhow, in the meantime he has already given up on this coral. Beyond that he doesn’t have time/isn’t at work everyday to feed it every day. Since my parameters at my home tank are finally perfect, I thought about giving it a try to see if I could resuscitate it for him. I have the time (and the lack of life) to feed it every night too, if I were to try. It always had some hair algae but this week in his tank it developed a bunch of bubble algae all over it. My question is: *Is it worth introducing the bad algae to try and save it?* My tank at home doesn’t have any kind of problem algae (bubble or hair) and I actually have a little fuge with dragon tongue and tons of chaeto that does such a good job, I worried about not having enough food for my emerald crab (I constantly feed him the good algae). But is it worth contaminating my tank to try to bring this coral back to life? (Even though my emerald might consider it an awesome snack). What do you guys think?

B94B4F52-0EA0-485A-845F-1EEAAAE642C1.jpeg
 
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desagon

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I dont understand whats going on. Are you saying you want to introduce bad algae to your tank so you can feed a crab? Also, is this a pic of your friends tank, or yours? That sun coral is gone...
 

mdb_talon

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I have seen sun coral polyps come back from an apparently dead (and turned brown) skeleton so I would not really say it is a lost cause... but certainly a long shot. If you dont have bubble algae in the DT I would not add it to the DT on the chance of saving that sun coral
 
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gr8pretender

gr8pretender

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I dont understand whats going on. Are you saying you want to introduce bad algae to your tank so you can feed a crab? Also, is this a pic of your friends tank, or yours? That sun coral is gone...

First of all. No I don't want to "just" introduce bad algae to feed a crab, I want to try to bring the coral back to life. Feeding the crab is secondary and just a bonus if I were to try. This is a pic of my coworkers tank. Yeah the sun coral looks gone, but there was literally JUST a post on R2R somewhere talking about not throwing out corals so quickly because they can come back with some TLC. Like I said, he's given up on it and is going to throw it out. Basically, I'm asking if it is worth introducing the bad algae to save it - I wasn't asking you to judge me for pondering about it.
 
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Critteraholic

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But is it worth introducing a good amount of hair and bubble algae to try to bring this coral back to life? (Even though my emerald might consider it an awesome snack). What do you guys think?
If you want to make a go of it... Pick off all the algae you can, scrub the outside of the skeleton and top edges gently, and hit the outside with hydrogen peroxide - q-tip or paintbrush (craft kind). Set it back into the water (I use glass custard dishes) and and let it bubble a bit and then wipe the bubbles off and rinse. That should kill the algae on the outside. You would still be taking a risk from algae inside the skeleton. I would recommend using Reef Roids to start. Just drizzle a bit down into the mouth. It looks too tiny to take pieces of food.

P.S. Also soak that whole frag rock with the peroxide. You could set that in a small container and pour peroxide up to the edge, without getting the whole coral in it.
 
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desagon

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First of all. No I don't want to "just" introduce bad algae to feed a crab, I want to try to bring the coral back to life. Feeding the crab is secondary and just a bonus if I were to try. This is a pic of my coworkers tank. Yeah the sun coral looks gone, but there was literally JUST a post on R2R somewhere talking about not throwing out corals so quickly because they can come back with some TLC. Like I said, he's given up on it and is going to throw it out. Basically, I'm asking if it is worth introducing the bad algae to save it - I wasn't asking you to judge me for pondering about it.
lol ok. You're on a reefing forum asking people if its ok to introduce nuisance algae to your tank.
 
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gr8pretender

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I have seen sun coral polyps come back from an apparently dead (and turned brown) skeleton so I would not really say it is a lost cause... but certainly a long shot. If you dont have bubble algae in the DT I would not add it to the DT on the chance of saving that sun coral
Thanks for the helpful input! Much appreciated. :)
 

Viva'sReef

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If being a nurse is your thing, by all means try and save it. Just make sure you are ready for a painfully slow recovery that could take the better part of a year just to bring that one polyp back to life. Also recommend trying to get rid of that bubble algae first before introducing it to your tank. If it was me though the coral graveyard is its next home.
 

samnaz

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I think most people would say it isn't worth the risk. But IME you’re going to end up with bubble algae either way, at some point. Given the current state of my tank I couldn’t care less about introducing algae, and would happily try to nurse that sun coral back to health. That’s just me though. Only you can say for yourself if it makes sense for you and your tank. It’s possible it could survive, though not likely.
 

samnaz

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And you're on a reefing forum trolling and passing judgement on innocent questions. Who crapped in your aquarium? Rethink your life dude.
They even admitted they don’t understand your question. I’m curious why feel the need to answer if you don’t know what’s even being asked? Keep scrolling ;-)
 
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gr8pretender

gr8pretender

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If being a nurse is your thing, by all means try and save it. Just make sure you are ready for a painfully slow recovery that could take the better part of a year just to bring that one polyp back to life. Also recommend trying to get rid of that bubble algae first before introducing it to your tank. If it was me though the coral graveyard is its next home.
I definitely wanted to try and save it because I really would enjoy taking the time to nurse it back to good health, that in itself is super rewarding, especially if it survives. I actually even purchased a hang on convalescent home acrylic box, just so I could give it a go without introducing the algae. My thought process was problem algae is always is a risk with every animal you put in the tank, so not to sweat it as much and the crab might have it under control before it even would spread. I wouldn't put it in the tank as is, shake off what I could... but of course it would still have spores and may eventually show up anyway. It is helpful to hear that maybe the coral isn't quite worth the trouble though.
 

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