Complex beginner build

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vetteguy53081

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This is some fantastic craftsmanship and a build worth following
 

biecacka

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You could epoxy the pole or wrap it in acrylic and then make it also where the overflow goes? That would prevent multiple large holes in the bottom of the tank.

Corey
 

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I guess if I had to do it this is how I would set it up. You can hide the gap in the back you seem handy enough.

Thought.jpg

The only other option is
A. split bottom (bad idea)
B. Re place the support brace in a different area for the load bearing you can face the poles so they are not ugly. (better idea and much easier)
This is similar to what you did to the base:
Column-ideas_exterior-wood-ideas.jpg

C. solid glass bottom with the cut out temp brace the ceiling pull the pole and slide it over. (pain in the butt however pretty cool however that's never coming out again.

Thought.jpg
 
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Adellimore

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I know you didn't ask, but I can't resist the temptation to give some advice. I am definitely not trying to talk you out of it either - I think it's a pretty awesome concept, but I just don't feel right keeping silent on this one.

I have built a few tanks over the years, but never like this. If you were a customer paying me to do it, my first thought would be to talk you out of it. If I couldn't, I would try to talk you into two tanks that made a sort of "bracket" around the post. The two tanks would come together, and the seam would be hidden by a 5 or 6 inch board that matched the stand (beautiful stand by the way).

The two "backs" would have a wall of live rock, and an overflow drilled into it so that you can have a sump, and run both tanks as one system. On one side, I would do reef, and the other would be fish only with live rock.

If you are interested in the concept, I could do a sketchup model for you if you were willing to send me the measurements.

I would do two tanks because - if you change your mind or move, you can take it with you, and only have to remake the stand.

I say it'll work, and can even be drilled, but a little planning is in order.

Happy reefing!
Mr. Handy! Thanks for the feedback advice. I feel like I am somewhat in a bubble and don’t know too much about the hobby.

Besides not being able to move to move the tank once built is there any reason not to build it this way?
 
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Adellimore

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I guess if I had to do it this is how I would set it up. You can hide the gap in the back you seem handy enough.

Thought.jpg

The only other option is
A. split bottom (bad idea)
B. Re place the support brace in a different area for the load bearing you can face the poles so they are not ugly. (better idea and much easier)
This is similar to what you did to the base:
Column-ideas_exterior-wood-ideas.jpg

C. solid glass bottom with the cut out temp brace the ceiling pull the pole and slide it over. (pain in the butt however pretty cool however that's never coming out again.

Thought.jpg
Why would option A be a bad idea?

I was planning on using a ghost overflow that I saw from BRS and not drilling the bottom at all. Is there a benefit to drilling the bottom vs the back of the tank?
 
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Adellimore

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My father always tells me experience is a good teacher but charges like a specialist. I hope I don’t regret this investment but I decided to go with two panes of glass on the bottom and wrap the pole on glass.

I went with 1/2 laminated low iron glass and 30” inches high. I’m guessing I need to brace this?

I have been looking into silicone injection and was wondering what is the gap I should use to inject the silicone. I see people online creating a 1/16” gap but would a larger gap and more silicone be stronger?

Thanks for all your feedback so far!!

 

NotASpammerDude

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I have a feeling it's going to work for you... I have a feeling we are under estimating the power of silicone... but I have never built something so large and that will be holding so much water...

the 1/16" gap is a good idea because if you think about it, glass on glass does not "adhere" to anything, so adding silicone between the glass increases your "adhesion" "area" greatly. I assume that as long as you use the "right" silicone (high quality) then your tank will stick together.
 
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vetteguy53081

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I believe you can utilize the pole. Zoos and Public aquariums use a marine safe epoxy in their systems and I don't see why it would not fully protect both the pole and you from any elements entering the tank
 

NotASpammerDude

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and braces are a great idea, especially if you don't mind having them. people remove braces because of aesthetic reasons... I would assume, based on the work you've done so far, that you don't mind going the extra mile to ensure "safety" over "appearance" but that's my 2 cents talking ;)
 
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Adellimore

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and braces are a great idea, especially if you don't mind having them. people remove braces because of aesthetic reasons... I would assume, based on the work you've done so far, that you don't mind going the extra mile to ensure "safety" over "appearance" but that's my 2 cents talking ;)
Yea I plan on building a removable canopy so the top of the tank will be hidden by the canopy. Having never done something like this I just want to ensure that 220 gallons won’t make the half inch glass buckle or something crazy.
 

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Why would option A be a bad idea?

I was planning on using a ghost overflow that I saw from BRS and not drilling the bottom at all. Is there a benefit to drilling the bottom vs the back of the tank?
Because you are trusting a silicone seam at the base of the tank to hold 150 gallons or 1290lbs at the weakest point of the tank. That being said If you do an incredible job on the silicone and your base is absolutely perfectly level I think you might pull it off. I am actually excited to see if it works. I really want you to be successful because its such a crazy idea. Best of luck to you!
 

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Yea I plan on building a removable canopy so the top of the tank will be hidden by the canopy. Having never done something like this I just want to ensure that 220 gallons won’t make the half inch glass buckle or something crazy.
(24 ") X (60 ") X (24 ") =
149.61039 US gallons
 
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Adellimore

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Because you are trusting a silicone seam at the base of the tank to hold 150 gallons or 1290lbs at the weakest point of the tank. That being said If you do an incredible job on the silicone and your base is absolutely perfectly level I think you might pull it off. I am actually excited to see if it works. I really want you to be successful because its such a crazy idea. Best of luck to you!
I see what you’re saying. I think I might cover the seams of the bottom of the tank with a plate of glass to reinforce it. Do you think that will make it more secure?

I have silicone coming in from BRS next Friday so I will do my best to get it secure and do a water test
 

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I see what you’re saying. I think I might cover the seams of the bottom of the tank with a plate of glass to reinforce it. Do you think that will make it more secure?

I have silicone coming in from BRS next Friday so I will do my best to get it secure and do a water test
I would absolutely reinforce it somehow. This is easy for me to say however I would never do what you are trying to pull off. I went to school to be an engineer. I would have moved the pole LOL
 
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Adellimore

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I would absolutely reinforce it somehow. This is easy for me to say however I would never do what you are trying to pull off. I went to school to be an engineer. I would have moved the pole LOL
I wish I could have moved it these last few days. Honestly the idea for the fish tank came up as a way to hide the pole.

Now after researching the hobby so much I wanted the tank for the tanks sake and not just to hide a support column lol.
 
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