Complex beginner build

BornHandy

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 30, 2017
Messages
253
Reaction score
337
Location
Huntsville AL
Mr. Handy! Thanks for the feedback advice. I feel like I am somewhat in a bubble and don’t know too much about the hobby.

Besides not being able to move to move the tank once built is there any reason not to build it this way?
The only hesitation would be saltwater rusting away the integrity of the support post (over time). So long as you protect that support beam, maintenance on the post wouldn't be much of a concern. If you can keep that post away from the water, I say build what you want and have fun. I always felt like the build is half the fun anyway...
 
Corals.com

Bryson.bobby

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 17, 2019
Messages
1,868
Reaction score
7,888
Location
Zanesville
The only hesitation would be saltwater rusting away the integrity of the support post (over time). So long as you protect that support beam, maintenance on the post wouldn't be much of a concern. If you can keep that post away from the water, I say build what you want and have fun. I always felt like the build is half the fun anyway...
I don’t think the poll is going to actually be in the water. It looks like he’s making a “box” of glass around it.
 

BornHandy

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 30, 2017
Messages
253
Reaction score
337
Location
Huntsville AL
I don’t think the poll is going to actually be in the water. It looks like he’s making a “box” of glass around it.
Oh, I see where my post was a little unclear.

I never thought the post was going to be directly in contact with the water. I'm just a crusty old reefer from back in the day that has seen a few issues that most people (including me) would never think about. I mentioned it because spills are inevitable, as well as increased humidity in the area, and that adds up over time.

I could easily see 5 or 6 years of "a drip here and a spill there" rusting out enough of the base of the post to weaken it.

I changed light fixtures in my house one time, and all of the lights that were in the same room as the tank had began to rust on the inside of the stamped metal. You couldn't see it because the polished surfaces of the fixtures were still corrosion free, but it was really heavy on the back side of all of the metal. All of the fixtures in the rest of the house were ok.

That pole wouldn't stop me for sure, but I would add a little protection on it, just for my own peace of mind, if it were my house.
 
Top Shelf Aquatics
OP
Adellimore

Adellimore

Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 21, 2019
Messages
39
Reaction score
131
Location
New York
Over the last few weeks I spent more time researching silicone joining methods and understanding tank building a lot more. I made some updates after fully realizing how insane this build is. If I could do it all over I would reduce the height and make it 24" high instead of 30". Those extra 6" are what might keep me up at night once I get water in it in two weeks.

With that said I am adding some updates to try any make everything a bit more secure. This has defiantly been a fun experiment in tank building and I am happy where where it is so far.

So here is what I got done so far...
I blew out a space behind the wall so that I can do my plumbing. I am setting up the sump in the boiler room. (My other crazy idea is the water heaters and furnace might help to heat my tank lol)
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_24f1.jpg




I decided to add two 1/2" bottom panes (total of 1" of glass on the bottom) with the seams staggered and the glass layers siliconed together. This should eliminate or reduce any horizontal tension on either seam created by the weight of the water.

The column is covered in 1/2" glass as well so that no water will hit the pole. I will add a cap at the top of the column so that so water can enter from the top as well.
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2507.jpg


I then drilled the back pane of glass for the ghost overflow ( I felt like I was getting ahead of myself because I don't even know if this all will hold water lol)
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_24fb.jpg


Finally I got all the sides of the tank up. It was super heavy to lift and very scary to make sure it was secure.
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2508.jpg


Now I am at the point of cleaning out the seams so I can:

add the Euro Bracing on the bottom like @BornHandy Recommended,
add panes of glass over the seams where the bottom sheet joins,
add Euro Bracing on the top,
and finally add 2 horizontal 4" braces on the top on either side of the pole.


It takes for ever to get the excess silicone all cleaned from the glass and now I am realizing why a 30" high tank is so much more work!
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_250f.jpg


I am also looking into corner caps for the front of the tank. I see people use plastic caps, but I am considering using two thin pieces of 1/4" to cap the corners. I haven't seen anyone use glass caps before, but my thinking is that it will add more structural support and the glass will bond to the glass better than plastic. Am I wrong in my line of thinking?

Thanks again for all the feedback thus far and joining me on this crazy project. This forum has been my place to look to as my girlfriend is tired of me talking her ear off about fish, corals, glass and silicone. :)
 
Last edited:

Hallowhead

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 27, 2019
Messages
1,199
Reaction score
640
Location
New Jersey
Over the last few weeks I spent more time researching silicone joining methods and understanding tank building a lot more. I made some updates after fully realizing how insane this build is. If I could do it all over I would reduce the height and make it 24" high instead of 30". Those extra 6" are what might keep me up at night once I get water in it in two weeks.

With that said I am adding some updates to try any make everything a bit more secure. This has defiantly been a fun experiment in tank building and I am happy where where it is so far.

So here is what I got done so far...
I blew out a space behind the wall so that I can do my plumbing. I am setting up the sump in the boiler room. (My other crazy idea is the water heaters and furnace might help to heat my tank lol)
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_24f1.jpg




I decided to add two 1/2" bottom panes (total of 1" of glass on the bottom) with the seams staggered and the glass layers siliconed together. This should eliminate or reduce any horizontal tension on either seam created by the weight of the water.

The column is covered in 1/2" glass as well so that no water will hit the pole. I will add a cap at the top of the column so that so water can enter from the top as well.
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2507.jpg


I then drilled the back pane of glass for the ghost overflow ( I felt like I was getting ahead of myself because I don't even know if this all will hold water lol)
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_24fb.jpg


Finally I got all the sides of the tank up. It was super heavy to lift and very scary to make sure it was secure.
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_2508.jpg


Now I am at the point of cleaning out the seams so I can:

add the Euro Bracing on the bottom like Born Handy Recommended,
add panes of glass over the seams where the bottom sheet joins,
add Euro Bracing on the top,
and finally add 2 horizontal 4" braces on the top on either side of the pole.


It takes for ever to get the excess silicone all cleaned from the glass and now I am realizing why a 30" high tank is so much more work!
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_250f.jpg


I am also looking into corner caps for the front of the tank. I see people use plastic caps, but I am considering using two thin pieces of 1/4" to cap the corners. I haven't seen anyone use glass caps before, but my thinking is that it will add more structural support and the glass will bond to the glass better than plastic. Am I wrong in my line of thinking?

Thanks again for all the feedback thus far and joining me on this crazy project. This forum has been my place to look to as my girlfriend is tired of me talking her ear off about fish, corals, glass and silicone. :)
That is AMAZING! Going to be a one of a kind for sure. Awesome progress can't wait to see water
 

EmdeReef

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Dec 2, 2017
Messages
2,723
Reaction score
4,199
Location
New York, NY
This is absolutely insane i cant wait to see you finish
+1

Good luck and keep posting your progress!

I know it may be late but I’d extend that glass box around the pole at least 5” above the water level.

Salt creep, splashing and humidity and you may have a big issue very soon. I think pretty much all of us have experienced rust/corrosion on seemingly dry equipment.

Does the glass box around the pole extend all the way down to the floor?

Your sump area is gonna average 10-40%+ humidity above room levels assuming the AC is on virtually non stop in the summer.
 

Goodair

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 15, 2019
Messages
638
Reaction score
754
Location
South River, NJ
+1

Good luck and keep posting your progress!

I know it may be late but I’d extend that glass box around the pole at least 5” above the water level.

Salt creep, splashing and humidity and you may have a big issue very soon. I think pretty much all of us have experienced rust/corrosion on seemingly dry equipment.

Does the glass box around the pole extend all the way down to the floor?

Your sump area is gonna average 10-40%+ humidity above room levels assuming the AC is on virtually non stop in the summer.
That is a good point, water will inevitably hit that pole and wrapping it in some fabric or other material would prob work, might be too late to give it a protective paint coat.
 
OP
Adellimore

Adellimore

Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 21, 2019
Messages
39
Reaction score
131
Location
New York
Nicely done! Can you explain a little more what you mean by the glass corner caps?

Awesome build, by the way.
Being that this is my first time working with glass and silicone I wanted some piece of mind by adding trim to the outer vertical joints. I found a video with a guy adding plastic trim to the outside with silicone and wanted to do the same only with 1/4” glass

image.jpg

I would do something like this, only to pieces of 1/4” thick glass jointed like an L with a ton of silicone to add my strength to the seam.

Here is where I got the idea from:
I figured glass would bond to glass better and it would take away from the asthetic as much as plastic would.

What do you think? I haven’t seen any other tanks build this was so maybe I am doing too much to reinvent the wheel. I was just looking for extra insurance for leaks.
 
OP
Adellimore

Adellimore

Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 21, 2019
Messages
39
Reaction score
131
Location
New York
+1

Good luck and keep posting your progress!

I know it may be late but I’d extend that glass box around the pole at least 5” above the water level.

Salt creep, splashing and humidity and you may have a big issue very soon. I think pretty much all of us have experienced rust/corrosion on seemingly dry equipment.

Does the glass box around the pole extend all the way down to the floor?

Your sump area is gonna average 10-40%+ humidity above room levels assuming the AC is on virtually non stop in the summer.
I see what you’re saying. I will take a trip to the all powerful Home Depot and see if I can see some epoxy kits or better paint for the top of the pole.

The bottom of the tank shouldn’t get any constant exposure to the water because the sump is going in the boiler room.

At the top of the glass column I am adding a cap so that nothing will get inside the column. Maybe I should find a medium to fill the void with before I cover it though lol.
 
Top Shelf Aquatics

Can you run a a successful reef long term without some type of reactor and media?

  • Yes

    Votes: 100 71.9%
  • No

    Votes: 16 11.5%
  • Not sure

    Votes: 23 16.5%

Online statistics

Members online
1,181
Guests online
2,896
Total visitors
4,077
Zoanthids.com
Top