Which light colour is best for corals!

oreo5457

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,525
Reaction score
1,529
If nothing else, just know that daylight (true full spectrum, not LED manufacturer full spectrum) for growth and color and then blue it up to illuminate when you want to look at stuff.
All "common" artificial lights used (t5, mh, hps, led) are not true full sunlight spectrum with a few uncommon exceptions and even those don't count unless you somewhat limit the sunlight spectrum.
At depth lots of red/green..
sunlight.JPG



How many reef light sources contain about 25% red?
Close to 50% yellow to blue green?
 
SWEET 17 After Sale!

A. grandis

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
3,258
Reaction score
1,795
Spectrum graphics measure only what meters can read. The reality of each single photons is still far from what any of those graphics would show with their detailed connections. The meters are still very poor showing such graphics. They are way too simple. LEDs will never be able to offer the rich consistent spectrum blend of halides. They are totally different by nature! LEDs are very specific and limited by surface area/ distributed light/ applicable intensity in comparison. Besides, they use individual lenses.

Metal halide bulbs will offer to the corals the quality of the blending of: a very close to optimal and more complete spectrum, optimal distribution, and the right intensity. It's the whole spectrum! It makes reef tanks look just like the ocean!

Although scientifically we know that photosynthesis depends on certain aspects of light and are limited to some numbers, in my opinion we shouldn't isolate that type of information if we want to mimic the intensity and spectrum to resemble natural light over our reefs as much as we could. But only IF we chose that as optimal! I said that before and will say again... science is great! I love it! It serves to prove to us what reality shows. If the optimal is the ocean, then the optimal in our tanks should look like that too! Isolated scientific experiments are only part of the puzzle of what happens in our tanks. We will need all the pieces to finish the puzzle and see how they interconnect.
Photosynthesis isn't all light provides to.
Other types of light can maintain reefs, but halides are still the king of lights. Practically there is nothing that will change that. To "maintain" is different than to "explode with life". That simple.

That's why so many people are changing to halides and when they do they report changes in as little as 2 weeks. Real pigments and faster growth. Enough of struggling corals and high prices all over the world! To save energy?? People need grow corals to exchange and automatically lower their prices, like before. I miss when we used to call the corals by their scientific names. Many scientific names have changed with new DNA studies. That is how science is. We are still at the beginning of understanding many things in the whole process of reef lighting. But results don't lie!

65K, 10K and 14K.
 

A. grandis

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
3,258
Reaction score
1,795
I've been away from this thread for a while. If the 'best' light is for photosynthesis, spectrum doesn't matter much (when most considering aquarium lighting) and it sure doesn't matter when intensity exceeds the Saturation Point (usually 300 to 400 PAR). Of course, excessive PAR and Photoinhibition Points (Dynamic and Chronic) can cause bleaching. On the other hand, fluorescent proteins are produced when the coral animal is exposed to violet/blue light. Non-fluorescent colors (chromoproteins) are a result of exposure to violet/blue light at higher intensities.
See what Dana wrote... IF the "best" light is for photosynthesis. That's an isolated benefit to zooxanthellae.
 

oreo5457

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,525
Reaction score
1,529
Spectrum graphics measure only what meters can read. The reality of each single photons is still far from what any of those graphics would show with their detailed connections. The meters are still very poor showing such graphics. They are way too simple. LEDs will never be able to offer the rich consistent spectrum blend of halides. They are totally different by nature! LEDs are very specific and limited by surface area/ distributed light/ applicable intensity in comparison.
Pure BS..
You need to start a mega-church.




 
Last edited:

A. grandis

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
3,258
Reaction score
1,795
Pure BS..
You need to start a mega-church.




LOL!
edit: Use that LED and compare to a halide with same intensity. You will bun the corals before you reach growth. LEDs are limited to their diodes for spectrum. Results don't lie, Mr. computer.
 
Last edited:
Fritz

oreo5457

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,525
Reaction score
1,529
LEDs are limited to their diodes for spectrum. Results don't lie, Mr. computer.
And halides are limited by mercury emission bands and salts.. What is your point?
LED's can be "phosphored" the same as t5's for all intents and purposes..

Facts are facts..

Kyocera uses a violet pump with RGB phosphors to closely emulate the spectrum at depth.
T5's and MH's can do the same but ...they don't.
Since they both use mercury they will always have the mercury spikes part. in green.

As to burning I have no love for the cheap "TIR" lenses used in LED's.
The lens is separate from the "LED".

Really, few want "natural". It just is.
 
Last edited:

A. grandis

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
3,258
Reaction score
1,795
And halides are limited by mercury emission bands and salts.. What is your point?
LED's can be "phosphored" the same as t5's for all intents and purposes..

Facts are facts..

Kyocera uses a violet pump with RGB phosphors to closely emulate the spectrum at depth.
T5's and MH's can do the same but ...they don't.
Since they both use mercury they will always have the mercury spikes part. in green.

As to burning I have no love for the cheap "TIR" lenses used in LED's.
The lens is separate from the "LED".

Really, few want "natural". It just is.
Have you actually used or seen the Kyrocera over a reef tank?
Have you used any halides and/or T5s?
What about natural sun light? Have grown corals under sunlight to be able to compare? Any snorkeling, at least?
Have you actually had or worked with any corals at all?
See... my post was about hands on experiences, if read carefully.
 

oreo5457

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,525
Reaction score
1,529
Have you actually used or seen the Kyrocera over a reef tank?
Have you used any halides and/or T5s?
What about natural sun light? Have grown corals under sunlight to be able to compare? Any snorkeling, at least?
Have you actually had or worked with any corals at all?
See... my post was about hands on experiences, if read carefully.
Others have.. what's your point?
I've never sat on the sun but know it's darn hot.
Have you personally ran EVERY led fixture to compare them?
Had "hands on experience" with them? Or are you relying on others.
Thought so.

 
Last edited:

A. grandis

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
3,258
Reaction score
1,795
Others have.. what's your point?
I've never sat on the sun but know it's darn hot.
Have you personally ran EVERY led fixture to compare them?
Had "hands on experience" with them? Or are you relying on others.
Thought so.

I've seen that video in the other thread...
At least we know they are a little better than the pucks they sell in America. Again... waste of money if you want to be able to supply all intensity as a simple halide fixture does, just to try halide results.
 

A. grandis

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
3,258
Reaction score
1,795
People ignore videos like this... here is what the so called "guru of reef lighting" (Dr. Sanjay knows a lot about lighting and have experiences with metal halides and LEDs for so many years) has to say after his experiences with LEDs for so many years:
Efficiency of metal halide is related to it's ability to supply the intensity needed with a stable/ rich spectrum at the same time. LEDs? He can live with it. I'm not sure for how long.

About colors... the misleading of the blue LEDs to "color the corals".

He looked at scientific data... We are doing this for 25+ years...
The hobby is taking a different course now...

Look at the video of his corals. Pale looking colonies and weird colonies' structures. Some of them have dead spots. Put that halide system back over that reef and I give you 3 weeks to show some bright colors again! That's what I'm talking about!!

Just opinions... experiences and results tell us, period. Call it preference if you want!
The research Dana and others do is extremely important to sustain the subjects involved in reef keeping. To have the science connected to the hobby is indeed the best gift we have. Lot's of things we know today comes from Dana's works alone. That is a major contribution to our hobby. He knows the limits of each work and we all know that no one knows everything yet. Therefore empirical information are very important as well!!! That's what I'm talking about!
 

oreo5457

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,525
Reaction score
1,529
Others have.. what's your point

I've seen that video in the other thread...
At least we know they are a little better than the pucks they sell in America. Again... waste of money if you want to be able to supply all intensity as a simple halide fixture does, just to try halide results.
Waste of money for who?
I try not to judge what people " waste their money on ".
Kind of rude.
I may mention a cheaper alternative. :)
 

oreo5457

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,525
Reaction score
1,529
If the 'best' light is for photosynthesis, spectrum doesn't matter much (when most considering aquarium lighting) and it sure doesn't matter when intensity exceeds the Saturation Point (usually 300 to 400 PAR). Of course, excessive PAR and Photoinhibition Points (Dynamic and Chronic) can cause bleaching. On the other hand, fluorescent proteins are produced when the coral animal is exposed to violet/blue light. Non-fluorescent colors (chromoproteins) are a result of exposure to violet/blue light at higher intensities.

No mention of source of light.
MH, T5, LED, LEP they are different.. Gee go figure..
 
Lazys Coral House

[email protected]

Living the Reef Life
View Badges
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
31,917
Reaction score
43,942
Location
Ontario, California

[email protected]

Living the Reef Life
View Badges
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
31,917
Reaction score
43,942
Location
Ontario, California
Let's all make room for one another. Reef tanks can be run using MH, T5, LED's or combinations of those. No need to get heated over this.

i like turtles GIF
 

A. grandis

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
3,258
Reaction score
1,795
Stop telling people they are wasting money or buying toys.
Try making your point without preaching
Do you have anything to say about the videos and the points I made in regards to observations and experiences?
 
Last edited:
BRS

Can you house your most favorite ocean creature in your home aquarium?

  • Yes and I do!

    Votes: 56 15.5%
  • Yes but I don't have one

    Votes: 65 18.0%
  • Yes but it would be illegal

    Votes: 18 5.0%
  • Yes but you would need a HUGE aquarium

    Votes: 60 16.6%
  • No but I wish

    Votes: 147 40.6%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 16 4.4%

Online statistics

Members online
732
Guests online
3,142
Total visitors
3,874

New Posts

TSM Aquatics
Top