Which light colour is best for corals!

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jda

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Hamilton, Giesemann and ReefBrite have all made "new" offerings of reef-based MH bulbs in the last few years. They have less heat and they change the colors up a bit. The RB ones have dual arcs for daytime and nightime viewing. Radium is a popular general lighting bulb in Europe and is still made in large numbers. Phoenix quit production in early 2010s and then started again when they judged the market wrongly and there was still a high demand.

People have been promising the demise of VHO and MH for more than a decade, but VHO is still being made and is profitable. Usage numbers are up on MH (if you can believe the vendors and manufacturers). I would not sweat this any time soon.
 

sde1500

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What a read.
Dr. Sanjay is called the authority of reef lighting by the best reef keepers in the world. He is very respected in that line. If you choose not to believe in my experiences, please at least consider the video and what he said about that particular coral
Yes he seems very knowledgeable. I'd imagine he has the ability to choose the light he thinks works best for the overall success of a very beautiful successful tank. It seems he chose LEDs, I see hundreds of corals in his tank that look wonderful. I couldn't imagine you would decide to write off this expert's choice because one coral didn't look great.

Do you know the real reason why Dr. Sanjay changed his lights?
Do you think the FACTS will change just because they have LEDs over their tanks today? LOL!
It's clear that Dr. Sanjay is choosing at this moment to keep those LEDs
Oh boy, not only are you writing off his choice because one coral is more brown than yellow you're now claiming this expert is misleading us? That he wouldn't say he liked LED if he wasn't running them? Or is it deeper of a conspiracy?? I can't decide, do you want us to listen to this expert or not?

That Porites coral still looks rotten gray to me!
"Lack of yellows" (whatever that means) under what many call one of the "best LEDs in America"?
Dr. Sanjay: get that chiller running and program to turn off the halides when temperature goes too high! Put those halides back, my friend! :cool:
If the success or failure of one coral made us all change lights we'd have new light fixtures quarterly. You're asking us to consider the opinion of this expert, who uses LEDs, while saying his choice was wrong and he needs to switch lights. That is some real cognitive dissonance.

Facts are things that won't change under the same circumstances. If Dr. Sanjay change those LEDs for the halides again, and he adapt well those corals to the halides, the colors will be back!! What do you say about that?
Other things besides light affect color. Is it possible the color comes back? Sure. But to make a claim like that as a fact misses that there are other factors that could change as well. Considering you'll never have the chance to prove that, lets call it a theory.
Do you have more experience than him and Dr. Sanjay?
Do you have ANY experience?
Well, now that we are just chasing our tail here, I can't keep up. You're presenting him as the authority in reef lighting, while also saying he chose wrong using LED, and also insinuating an ulterior motive for him choosing/backing LEDs. What is it?
 

Revmh

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What a read.

Yes he seems very knowledgeable. I'd imagine he has the ability to choose the light he thinks works best for the overall success of a very beautiful successful tank. It seems he chose LEDs, I see hundreds of corals in his tank that look wonderful. I couldn't imagine you would decide to write off this expert's choice because one coral didn't look great.


Oh boy, not only are you writing off his choice because one coral is more brown than yellow you're now claiming this expert is misleading us? That he wouldn't say he liked LED if he wasn't running them? Or is it deeper of a conspiracy?? I can't decide, do you want us to listen to this expert or not?


If the success or failure of one coral made us all change lights we'd have new light fixtures quarterly. You're asking us to consider the opinion of this expert, who uses LEDs, while saying his choice was wrong and he needs to switch lights. That is some real cognitive dissonance.


Other things besides light affect color. Is it possible the color comes back? Sure. But to make a claim like that as a fact misses that there are other factors that could change as well. Considering you'll never have the chance to prove that, lets call it a theory.

Well, now that we are just chasing our tail here, I can't keep up. You're presenting him as the authority in reef lighting, while also saying he chose wrong using LED, and also insinuating an ulterior motive for him choosing/backing LEDs. What is it?
Well said.
 

A. grandis

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What a read.

Yes he seems very knowledgeable. I'd imagine he has the ability to choose the light he thinks works best for the overall success of a very beautiful successful tank. It seems he chose LEDs, I see hundreds of corals in his tank that look wonderful. I couldn't imagine you would decide to write off this expert's choice because one coral didn't look great.


Oh boy, not only are you writing off his choice because one coral is more brown than yellow you're now claiming this expert is misleading us? That he wouldn't say he liked LED if he wasn't running them? Or is it deeper of a conspiracy?? I can't decide, do you want us to listen to this expert or not?


If the success or failure of one coral made us all change lights we'd have new light fixtures quarterly. You're asking us to consider the opinion of this expert, who uses LEDs, while saying his choice was wrong and he needs to switch lights. That is some real cognitive dissonance.


Other things besides light affect color. Is it possible the color comes back? Sure. But to make a claim like that as a fact misses that there are other factors that could change as well. Considering you'll never have the chance to prove that, lets call it a theory.

Well, now that we are just chasing our tail here, I can't keep up. You're presenting him as the authority in reef lighting, while also saying he chose wrong using LED, and also insinuating an ulterior motive for him choosing/backing LEDs. What is it?
Edit:
;Hilarious
 
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Dana Riddle

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Here's a piece I wrote a few years ago concerning spectra and stony coral growth. (Spoiler alert - growth was not significantly different among different spectra, at least in these Porites fragments.)
If you're interested in coloration, this is a start:
 

Revmh

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Here's a piece I wrote a few years ago concerning spectra and stony coral growth. (Spoiler alert - growth was not significantly different among different spectra, at least in these Porites fragments.)
If you're interested in coloration, this is a start:
Thank you for the knowledge, as always.
 

A. grandis

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Here's a piece I wrote a few years ago concerning spectra and stony coral growth. (Spoiler alert - growth was not significantly different among different spectra, at least in these Porites fragments.)
If you're interested in coloration, this is a start:
Thank you, Dana.
 
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merereef

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Here's a piece I wrote a few years ago concerning spectra and stony coral growth. (Spoiler alert - growth was not significantly different among different spectra, at least in these Porites fragments.)
If you're interested in coloration, this is a start:
I will have a read thank you
 

PlasmaBoy

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Nearly every coral in your tank is collected on one breath and will have nearly the same sunlight at 2 feet. This is a 6500k spectrum. This looks pretty yellow, so even though it is best for growth and actual color, you will likely want to blue-it-up for illumination to look at the corals.

There are few single lights that can both render color and illuminate color well - a few different types of halides. Some LEDs can do Ok with a few different programs using different diodes. You need a mix of T5 bulbs to do this too.
Yep I run 5 hours of pure 6500k plasma, looks like **** , until I come home and the leds set scene :)
 
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merereef

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Here's a piece I wrote a few years ago concerning spectra and stony coral growth. (Spoiler alert - growth was not significantly different among different spectra, at least in these Porites fragments.)
If you're interested in coloration, this is a start:
Hi Dana... can you tell me if corals Can Survive and grow with the blue light only on LED or do they need uv and white etc?
 

Dana Riddle

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Hi Dana... can you tell me if corals Can Survive and grow with the blue light only on LED or do they need uv and white etc?
I don't think there is a universal answer to this question. It is well known that zooxanthellae clades have preferences to high light or low light, while some are 'generalists' and are highly adaptable. The question of preferred spectral quality is an unknown (at least to me.) Some zooxanthellae can uncouple antennae pigments thus preventing harsh light fields from harming their photosynthetic apparatus. It is known that far-red light (in excess of 700nm) can relax Photosystem I thus preventing a harmful electron bottleneck. I think the answer is in the examination of coral species (and their zooxanthellae populations) on a case-by-case basis. Is there a particular coral species you're interested in?
 
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merereef

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I don't think there is a universal answer to this question. It is well known that zooxanthellae clades have preferences to high light or low light, while some are 'generalists' and are highly adaptable. The question of preferred spectral quality is an unknown (at least to me.) Some zooxanthellae can uncouple antennae pigments thus preventing harsh light fields from harming their photosynthetic apparatus. It is known that far-red light (in excess of 700nm) can relax Photosystem I thus preventing a harmful electron bottleneck. I think the answer is in the examination of coral species (and their zooxanthellae populations) on a case-by-case basis. Is there a particular coral species you're interested in?
Thank you Dana, i just mean all corals...from what you have said above. Would you say its best to illuminate corals with a full spectrum light ? Rather than just blue uv and white?
 

Bpb

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Thank you Dana, i just mean all corals...from what you have said above. Would you say its best to illuminate corals with a full spectrum light ? Rather than just blue uv and white?
He’s saying corals are too varied in preference to make a generalization to the degree your question asks. He’s also saying most corals are highly adaptable, but different enough that some may tolerate blue only, and others may struggle mightily. The answer isn’t universal among all corals because all corals contain very different photosynthetic requirements. That’s why he asked if you had some species in particular he could recommend may be more tolerant of blue only.
 
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merereef

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He’s saying corals are too varied in preference to make a generalization to the degree your question asks. He’s also saying most corals are highly adaptable, but different enough that some may tolerate blue only, and others may struggle mightily. The answer isn’t universal among all corals because all corals contain very different photosynthetic requirements. That’s why he asked if you had some species in particular he could recommend may be more tolerant of blue only.
I got what he said, thank you for elaborating. What im just trying to find out is what dana would recommend from his tests in the lab and his overall experience with different light spectrums, his own anecdotal experience etc sorry if im not being very clear in what im asking
 
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Dana Riddle

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Thank you Dana, i just mean all corals...from what you have said above. Would you say its best to illuminate corals with a full spectrum light ? Rather than just blue uv and white?
A short period of full spectrum (say, 4 hours) and UV/blue/green (up to 550nm) for 8 hours would be a general recommendation.
 

PlasmaBoy

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can you share why you run the spectrum at close to day light?
Most of our corals are collected where the spectrum is full and the kelvin near 6500k. In my 10 years of reefing I’ve never seen the reaction corals get from plasma, apart from sunlit tanks. Main thing is u find out quickly which corals are deep water, they die real quick. The shallow corals grow crazy pace and colours. I’m going to document the process once my tank recovers from a rusty failed ecotech pump and the light getting stuck on for 48 hrs.
 
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merereef

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Most of our corals are collected where the spectrum is full and the kelvin near 6500k. In my 10 years of reefing I’ve never seen the reaction corals get from plasma, apart from sunlit tanks. Main thing is u find out quickly which corals are deep water, they die real quick. The shallow corals grow crazy pace and colours. I’m going to document the process once my tank recovers from a rusty failed ecotech pump and the light getting stuck on for 48 hrs.
thank you... would love to see what your tank looks like
 

PlasmaBoy

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A short period of full spectrum (say, 4 hours) and UV/blue/green (up to 550nm) for 8 hours would be a general recommendation.
This is exactly my setup, 4 hours plasma the rest is led. I also remove the 4 hour peaks on some days of the week to simulate cloudy weather and reduce heat in the room when I’m home. The plasma unit puts out a lot of heat into the room but not the water.
 

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