Current Quarantine Protocol

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Jay Hemdal

Jay Hemdal

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New reefer here, what is the diffrent between using cooper vs Rally Pro. DO they both treat the same thing?
Rally Pro is a low dose medication designed to be safe with some invertebrates. That also makes it less effective at controlling diseases. It contains formalin and acriflavine.
Copper is more effective at controlling protozoan diseases - the two worst are ich and velvet. Copper cannot be used with invertebrates.
Jay
 
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@Jay Hemdal, I never QT'ed my original fish from when I set up my 1st tank a couple years ago.
I have not lost any fish, but as I now have a larger tank and am considering adding new fish. I am planning to QT all my current fish (and any new fish/inverts/etc moving forward), and leave my DT fallow for 76 days so that I can move forward with a clean slate.

I know that my LFS has ick, etc in their tanks, and this is where I purchased all of my current fish when I started.

My question is that I have coral in my DT, and from what I have seen browsing through is that coral can harbor parasites for a certain period. Does the standard 76 days cover this? or would I have to extend the QT period?

Thanks in advance for your time
 
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@Jay Hemdal, I never QT'ed my original fish from when I set up my 1st tank a couple years ago.
I have not lost any fish, but as I now have a larger tank and am considering adding new fish. I am planning to QT all my current fish (and any new fish/inverts/etc moving forward), and leave my DT fallow for 76 days so that I can move forward with a clean slate.

I know that my LFS has ick, etc in their tanks, and this is where I purchased all of my current fish when I started.

My question is that I have coral in my DT, and from what I have seen browsing through is that coral can harbor parasites for a certain period. Does the standard 76 days cover this? or would I have to extend the QT period?

Thanks in advance for your time
Well, while it is possible for fish to carry latent infections, that is pretty rare after a year or more time…your existing fish are as clean as any coming out of a full quarantine (that is never 100% in any event).
IMO - I would just fully quarantine the new fish going forward.
Your corals are most likely not harboring any parasites now either - UNLESS you have had a biosecurity break that I’m unaware of - like you just bought a bunch of frags and added them last week (grin).
Jay
 

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Well, while it is possible for fish to carry latent infections, that is pretty rare after a year or more time…your existing fish are as clean as any coming out of a full quarantine (that is never 100% in any event).
IMO - I would just fully quarantine the new fish going forward.
Your corals are most likely not harboring any parasites now either - UNLESS you have had a biosecurity break that I’m unaware of - like you just bought a bunch of frags and added them last week (grin).
Jay
Would this still be the case even if I've added inverts and such periodically over that period?
If so, I would hold on putting the current residents through that stress..
 
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My thought process that led to this was that it was not worth fully QTing new fish coming in if I never did the originals

That is the general consensus, but unless you have recently added corals from a tank with mom-quarantined fish in it, the risk is pretty low.

Jay
 

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2021 Quarantine Procedures

Jay Hemdal
David Scarborough



Protozoans (Cryptocaryon/ich, Amyloodinium/velvet) and Metazoan trematodes/flukes are the most common parasites found on newly acquired fish. A carefully managed quarantine process can effectively eliminate these parasites before adding the fish to your display tank.

Quarantine tank Requirements:

Tank must be large enough to comfortably handle the number and size of fish for up to 9 weeks.
  • Tank should have a filtration system that has completed the nitrogen cycle. Canisters, HOB overflow filters, or appropriately sized sponge filters are acceptable.
  • The filtration system must not use carbon or other absorbing/adsorbing filtrants (e.g. Polyfilter) that might absorb copper or medication. NO calcareous rock LIVE or DEAD
  • Bare bottom should be used. A saucer with non-absorbing sand can be utilized for wrasses, gobies, blennies or other species which are overly stressed by the bare bottom. Painting the underside of the tank black can also help
  • Heater/thermometer
  • Removable structure, e.g. PVC pipe may be used to provide hiding places for the fish.
  • Ambient light will often be adequate for the QT tank.
  • A means to maintain oxygen levels should be available. Air stones and sponge filters are usually adequate.
  • A lid should be used to prevent the fish from jumping out of the tank.
  • Set salinity level and temperature to the same levels as in your Display Tank.
Days 1 – 2: Observation - let the fish settle in and determine proper diet.
  • Set QT temperature to 78 - 80 degrees F.
  • Acclimate the new fish to the QT:
    • Measure salinity of the water in which the fish arrived.
    • Adjust salinity in QT to within 2 ppt of the salinity of the water in which the fish arrived.
    • Acclimate the fish to the QT gradually over 45 minutes.
  • Observe the fish for any symptoms which might influence the treatment(s) you should administer.
  • Determine if the fish are eating adequately to proceed.
Day 2: Begin Copper Treatment
  • Add Coppersafe to the QT to achieve a concentration of 2.50 ppm over the course of 24 hours. This can be done in two doses 12 hours apart or multiple smaller doses if you prefer. Coppersafe will not be effective until a concentration over 2.0 ppm is present. A target of 2.50 ppm will allow for fluctuations without the risk of falling below the 2.0 ppm threshold. Hanna Copper checker is the most accurate test to use.
  • Never use ammonia removing products or other reducing agents (dechlorinator) when dosing copper. Most products bind copper with an amine to reduce toxicity to the fish. Reducing agents break that bond, releasing free copper that can harm the fish.
  • Feed and top off tank water normally.
Days 3 – 32: Continue Copper Treatment
  • Monitor copper ppm regularly. If fluctuations do not occur, you can skip day(s), but if the concentration falls below 2.0 ppm, you will need to restart the 30-day count for the copper treatment.
  • Monitor water quality parameters as you would for your display tank.
  • If the copper or ammonia levels ever exceed guidelines, be prepared to administer water changes to correct the problem.
Day 34: Copper Done
  • Begin copper removal through water changes.
  • Zeolites such as Cuprisorb may be used to hasten the removal process.
  • Carbon is usually too slow or ineffective at removing copper and should not be relied upon without adequate monitoring.
Day 35: Praziquantel Treatment #1
  • Confirm copper has been removed adequately to drop the concentration to less than 1 ppm. Copper and Prazi should not be administered simultaneously.
  • Add Prazipro to the QT per the instructions on the label.
  • Ensure the additional oxygenation source is working. This treatment will potentially reduce the oxygen levels within the QT to critical levels without additional air flow.

Day 42, Day 49: Praziquantel Treatment #2, #3
  • Add Prazipro to the QT per the instructions on the label, 7 days apart. Spacing needed for these treatments is based on killing new flukes hatching from previously laid eggs. The time interval is not well known. A range of 7 to 9 days seems to give the best results.

Day 64: New Fish QT complete
  • Observe fish for 2 weeks after last prazi dose. Note: many public aquariums do not move fish out of quarantine unless they are in the middle of a full copper treatment. This vastly reduces the risk from Cryptocaryon or Amyloodinium. To use that method, substitute a copper treatment for this 2 week observation period, and move the fish out around day 10.
  • Conduct a 5-minute fresh water dip if the fish is of a species particularly susceptible to Neobenedenia flukes. If flukes are detected, reduce QT salinity to 50% and hold for an additional 35 days.
  • Confirm salinity and temperature of QT and DT are the same, add fish to DT.
Any plans for a 2022 update? When you talk about "skipping days" what does that mean exactly??
 
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Any plans for a 2022 update? When you talk about "skipping days" what does that mean exactly??
We’ve actually been updating it all along, the last update was in June. Not sure what you mean about skipping days, can you quote the section?
Jay
 

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We’ve actually been updating it all along, the last update was in June. Not sure what you mean about skipping days, can you quote the section?
Jay
Days 3 – 32: Continue Copper Treatment
  • Monitor copper ppm regularly. If fluctuations do not occur, you can skip day(s), but if the concentration falls below 2.0 ppm, you will need to restart the 30-day count for the copper treatment.
 
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Days 3 – 32: Continue Copper Treatment
  • Monitor copper ppm regularly. If fluctuations do not occur, you can skip day(s), but if the concentration falls below 2.0 ppm, you will need to restart the 30-day count for the copper treatment.
Ahh, that just means you can skip TESTING on those days. The idea is that people often use the Hanna Checker, and that can be expensive to run tests on. If you are getting consistent readings, you don't need to test daily just to confirm that. I'll change that text to make that more clear.

Thanks,

Jay
 
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Ahh, that just means you can skip TESTING on those days. The idea is that people often use the Hanna Checker, and that can be expensive to run tests on. If you are getting consistent readings, you don't need to test daily just to confirm that. I'll change that text to make that more clear.

Thanks,

Jay
What are your thoughts on using either tap water for your QT tank?
 
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What are your thoughts on using either tap water for your QT tank?

All of my quarantine systems start with tap water except my coral observation systems. I keep the lights dimmer, so algae growth isn't an issue from extra nutrients.

You do need to confirm that your tap water is safe to use in aquariums. In most of the US it will be. Some cities have a chloramine treatment system that has to be dealt with a bit differently.

Jay
 

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All of my quarantine systems start with tap water except my coral observation systems. I keep the lights dimmer, so algae growth isn't an issue from extra nutrients.

You do need to confirm that your tap water is safe to use in aquariums. In most of the US it will be. Some cities have a chloramine treatment system that has to be dealt with a bit differently.

Jay
I live in Somers, NY, in a development where I believe we have well water which is treated before it comes to us. I have one of these on any sink that we drink from -

Waterdrop 10UA Under Sink Water Filter System, NSF/ANSI 42 Certified, Under Counter Water Filter Direct Connect to Kitchen Faucet, 8K Gallons High Chlorine Reduction Capacity, USA Tech​

 
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I live in Somers, NY, in a development where I believe we have well water which is treated before it comes to us. I have one of these on any sink that we drink from -

Waterdrop 10UA Under Sink Water Filter System, NSF/ANSI 42 Certified, Under Counter Water Filter Direct Connect to Kitchen Faucet, 8K Gallons High Chlorine Reduction Capacity, USA Tech​


Well water is a bit more variable. That filter uses carbon and a sediment filter I think. Check the pH of your tap water - if it is 7 or above, you should be fine.

Jay
 

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Well water is a bit more variable. That filter uses carbon and a sediment filter I think. Check the pH of your tap water - if it is 7 or above, you should be fine.

Jay
Cool. I will do that tonight! Your QT protocol... does it also go for new, rehomed, well established fish. I have 3 tangs that I got from good homes that have had them for a number of years with no issues. Purple, White tail and Desjarins. I've been doing a lot of reading and there are so many different opinions out there. Many are saying treating with copper could mess up their immune systems but I don't know. My biggest issue is that they just look like they hate these small quarters so much. Especially the sailfin who is 5 years old and from a guy who says he's been alone in a tank for a long time and never showed any signs of sickness.
 
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Cool. I will do that tonight! Your QT protocol... does it also go for new, rehomed, well established fish. I have 3 tangs that I got from good homes that have had them for a number of years with no issues. Purple, White tail and Desjarins. I've been doing a lot of reading and there are so many different opinions out there. Many are saying treating with copper could mess up their immune systems but I don't know. My biggest issue is that they just look like they hate these small quarters so much. Especially the sailfin who is 5 years old and from a guy who says he's been alone in a tank for a long time and never showed any signs of sickness.

Done properly the quarantine protocol won't do any real damage to the fish's immune system. However, quarantining large tangs requires ample tank space. If you don't have that, you might be better off forgoing it.

Jay
 
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Done properly the quarantine protocol won't do any real damage to the fish's immune system. However, quarantining large tangs requires ample tank space. If you don't have that, you might be better off forgoing it.

Jay
Do you think I should consider moving them all at once or one at a time. I want to make sure they all get along. They are in 2 separate QTs right now. 2 have been in copper 3 weeks and the newest one just started his copper.
 
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Do you think I should consider moving them all at once or one at a time. I want to make sure they all get along. They are in 2 separate QTs right now. 2 have been in copper 3 weeks and the newest one just started his copper.
Tough to say, tang compatibility is just not set in stone, too much individualism in each case. The argument can be made to add the most docile first and then the more territorial. The counter argument is to add them all at once so that no fish has an established territory….
Jay
 

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