Semi Floating Canopy Question

MONTANTK

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Hi everyone,

I am just starting to plan out a build for an aquarium stand and I am interested in possibly attaching a canopy to the stand. I have a very elementary sketch below. Basically, the stand is going to be 22 x 13.5 x 36 and made out of 3/4” plywood. I would screw a 2x4 to the back of the stand where it would extend 24” above the top of the stand. I would then screw in another 2x4 on top that extends out 20”. I’d add construct the remaining sides of the canopy out of 3/4” plywood and hang two AI primes, and maybe two reef brites.

So, my question is will that design be strong enough to support the lights and extra plywood?

1F5D3C2B-7933-4460-807C-68428755E23F.jpeg
 
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xxkenny90xx

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That will be alot of stress on the screws connecting the 2 2x4s. I would go to the hardware store and get some kind of bracket installed here
20210203_151951.jpg
 

littlefishy

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If we are looking at the 3.5" (4)wide part of the 2x4's in the pic and not the 1.5" (2) width then it would be enough. You would probably need to screw the canopy on slightly above level to be level after you add the light weight. To make sure, you could find out how much weight the lights are and clamp the 2x4 joint, or temp screw it till you get it right.
Additionally you could get a right angle flat bracket and cross the joint with that.
Also you could cut 4 pieces of plywood 4" wide, each piece continuous across the angle to replace the 2x4s. Glue and clamp them up! Plywood is much stronger than solid wood of the same dimensions. Unless it gets soaked.
 
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MONTANTK

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If we are looking at the 3.5" (4)wide part of the 2x4's in the pic and not the 1.5" (2) width then it would be enough. You would probably need to screw the canopy on slightly above level to be level after you add the light weight. To make sure, you could find out how much weight the lights are and clamp the 2x4 joint, or temp screw it till you get it right.
Additionally you could get a right angle flat bracket and cross the joint with that.
Also you could cut 4 pieces of plywood 4" wide, each piece continuous across the angle to replace the 2x4s. Glue and clamp them up! Plywood is much stronger than solid wood of the same dimensions. Unless it gets soaked.
Could you explain the 4 pieces of plywood? It sounds interesting but not sure I follow
 
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littlefishy

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Sure,
Plywood one-piece cutouts to your dimensions like this:

20210203_211240.jpg


Are much stronger than jointed lumber like this:

20210203_211249.jpg


You could just glue and clamp 2 3/4" thick pieces together or screw them together. Together they roughly equal a 2x4 in thickness.
If you wanted to get fancy you could imitate those waterfall countertops like this:

m_glass-front-kitchen-cabinets-flanking-cooktop.jpg


By making it the canopy edge go all the way around and down, same thickness. When you double up the pieces just screw from the inside piece into the outside show piece of plywood. It could look something like this:

20210203_211306.jpg


Anyways, my wife does our cad drawings. Sorry for the fred flintstones look.
 
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MONTANTK

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Sure,
Plywood one-piece cutouts to your dimensions like this:

20210203_211240.jpg


Are much stronger than jointed lumber like this:

20210203_211249.jpg


You could just glue and clamp 2 3/4" thick pieces together or screw them together. Together they roughly equal a 2x4 in thickness.
If you wanted to get fancy you could imitate those waterfall countertops like this:

m_glass-front-kitchen-cabinets-flanking-cooktop.jpg


By making it the canopy edge go all the way around and down, same thickness. When you double up the pieces just screw from the inside piece into the outside show piece of plywood. It could look something like this:

20210203_211306.jpg


Anyways, my wife does our cad drawings. Sorry for the fred flintstones look.
Oh okay that makes sense! I was actually thinking of doing that waterfall look you had mentioned! It gave me some inspiration so back to the drawing board I go! I really like that one piece cutout idea though so I may run with that
 
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MONTANTK

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Most people secure floating hoods to the wall studs. Hence the name floating hood. It is stronger and more secure as well.
Unfortunately, that’s not an option right now. If the tank was bigger I would never attempt it but given the small I feel like it’s more feasible
 
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Weasel1960

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If I understood it correctly I like the idea of layering 2 pieces of “L” shaped plywood together. You could sandwich a flat steel angle inside for added strength and trim the outside in wood. These could then be bolted to the 2x4 on the back of your stand
 
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MONTANTK

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If I understood it correctly I like the idea of layering 2 pieces of “L” shaped plywood together. You could sandwich a flat steel angle inside for added strength and trim the outside in wood. These could then be bolted to the 2x4 on the back of your stand
I like the idea of the steel angle in the middle! I think I know what I’m going to go with now
 

MnFish1

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Unfortunately, that’s not an option right now. If the tank was bigger I would never attempt it but given the small I feel like it’s more feasible
Curious - is it expense or some other reason that you want to do this - as compared to just using (for example) the mounting system that already comes with AI. PS - can you hang your canopy from the ceiling? AI has ceiling mounting kits. Lastly - how are you planning on mounting the AI's to the canopy?
 
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MONTANTK

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Curious - is it expense or some other reason that you want to do this - as compared to just using (for example) the mounting system that already comes with AI. PS - can you hang your canopy from the ceiling? AI has ceiling mounting kits. Lastly - how are you planning on mounting the AI's to the canopy?
Currently living in my parents house so I don’t want to put any holes in the wall or ceiling. I have the flex arms but they look ugly being mounted on the side of the tank. The plan is to hang them inside the canopy
 
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MnFish1

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Currently living in my parents house so I don’t want to put any holes in the wall or ceiling. I have the flex arms but they look ugly being mounted on the side of the tank. The plan is to hang them inside the canopy
I meant what method would you use to hang them in the canopy? Do you think heat would be a problem?
 

FloridaMatt

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146391356_468280697882467_3518189221466205641_n.jpg
145934865_796023097984861_5117157604498175942_n.jpg
146063846_290282279317186_630175163166273807_n.jpg



I used 3/4" metal conduit piping. I used a pipe bender to bend the 90 degrees, then hid it in the "floating" canopy. I'm very happy with how it turned out. I mounted a power strip and a ton of lighting all up in the canopy.

I can slide the whole canopy and conduit up and slide spacers underneath the back if I ever change lights or need more clearance, but I think it's in the sweet spot right now.
 

MnFish1

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146391356_468280697882467_3518189221466205641_n.jpg
145934865_796023097984861_5117157604498175942_n.jpg
146063846_290282279317186_630175163166273807_n.jpg



I used 3/4" metal conduit piping. I used a pipe bender to bend the 90 degrees, then hid it in the "floating" canopy. I'm very happy with how it turned out. I mounted a power strip and a ton of lighting all up in the canopy.

I can slide the whole canopy and conduit up and slide spacers underneath the back if I ever change lights or need more clearance, but I think it's in the sweet spot right now.
Could you post better pictures of what you did (i.e. with regular lights) - and the inside of the canopy - if its not too much trouble? I like the look of this
 
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