Floor Reinforcing?

SquattingSnail

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Hi All,

Longtime lurker, first time poster. If this isn't the correct place or would get more traction elsewhere please let me know.

I am planning on moving my 210 upstairs into the family room which is a converted garage. When it was renovated they used 16" oc 2x6 sleepers on edge over a vapor barrier on concrete. The sub floor is 1/2in ply. The aqaurium would run perpendicular to the sleepers. I am unsure if the flooring should be reinforced? Any input would be appreciated.
 
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Billdogg

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So the joists are sitting on concrete? If so, you could park any size tank you want there and it'll be fine, especially if the tank sits perpendicular to them.
 

dennis romano

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Not thrilled with over 1600 pounds sitting on half inch plywood IMO too thin. If you are sloppy like I am, salt water will cause delamination. Half inch will go bad fast. What kind of stand, plywood with a full side or does it have feet? With feet, you are concentrating the weight to the contact area. If anything, put another layer of plywood on top. Framing is fine
 

Mooses

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As a construction professional, as well as someone who really wanted their tank upstairs, “if you have to ask the question... the answer is usually no”.

My next question is why there is an elevated slab in your house..?
 

Spieg

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Sounds solid enough.
 
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SquattingSnail

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The stand is based off of Rocket Engineer's aquarium stand. No feet just 2x4. If I need to pull the carpet and subfloor to reinforce, I will but trying not make more work than necessary.

The slab itself isn't elevated, the opposite actually. The room was converted in the 70's from being a garage into an additional family room. I am guessing there was a stair going from the garage into the house, which is why the 2x6 sleepers are on edge. The rest of the house has the standard poured concrete basement/ foundation typically seen in central Wisconsin. I am planning on running the plumbing into the basement which will have it's own challenges due to this arrangement.
 

Pistondog

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Hi All,

Longtime lurker, first time poster. If this isn't the correct place or would get more traction elsewhere please let me know.

I am planning on moving my 210 upstairs into the family room which is a converted garage. When it was renovated they used 16" oc 2x6 sleepers on edge over a vapor barrier on concrete. The sub floor is 1/2in ply. The aqaurium would run perpendicular to the sleepers. I am unsure if the flooring should be reinforced? Any input would be appreciated.
Welcome squattingsnail,
If distributed, sounds like, the joists to concrete should handle the weight.
 

dennis romano

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My suggestion is to pull the carpet (probably will get ruined by salt), rip up the half inch plywood, run your plumbing in between the floor joists, put down 3/4 plywood and cover with vinyl which will repel water.
 
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SquattingSnail

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Thanks all. Talking with some folks about this and the big question I truly don't have a 100% answer to is related to the 2x6s and whether or not they truly are fully supported by the concrete. Only a visual inspection will allow me to have that peace of mind. Let the carpet ripping commence... my wife is going to kill me. I appreciate the feedback, thanks again.
 

DaneGer21

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Keep us updated!

...weather good or bad news. It may help someone else in question.
 

Mooses

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Thanks all. Talking with some folks about this and the big question I truly don't have a 100% answer to is related to the 2x6s and whether or not they truly are fully supported by the concrete. Only a visual inspection will allow me to have that peace of mind. Let the carpet ripping commence... my wife is going to kill me. I appreciate the feedback, thanks again.
So, how far above the concrete are the 2x6? It sounds like they just put the 2x6 in place to make the floor flush with the rest of the house? If that is the case, I would just demo out a "hole" in the 2x6s & place the stand on some CMU "risers". Or if you want to overkill, just pour yourself a little "riser" slab to set your stand on top of. Hope that makes sense.
 

derekgoude

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Think of the weight when you have 5 or 6 of your grown men friends over on the floor.

People have 15 friends over for super bowl parties upstairs and they jump all around when points are earned or what not.
 
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SquattingSnail

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So, how far above the concrete are the 2x6? It sounds like they just put the 2x6 in place to make the floor flush with the rest of the house? If that is the case, I would just demo out a "hole" in the 2x6s & place the stand on some CMU "risers". Or if you want to overkill, just pour yourself a little "riser" slab to set your stand on top of. Hope that makes sense.
I can let you know when i open it up and take a look. If they are directly touching concrete I was going to add bracing to tie together the joists. If they aren't touching I was to use 4x4 to build piers to bolt to the joists as extra support. My concern with pouring anything at this time of year are the temperatures and thermal conductivity of concrete.
Think of the weight when you have 5 or 6 of your grown men friends over on the floor.

People have 15 friends over for super bowl parties upstairs and they jump all around when points are earned or what not.

I am confident the floor could support something along those lines but my concern is over time (5-10 years)with a large static load and how the structure will fare. It is one thing to open the floor up now but totally another to have to do it with a mature reef tank on top.
 

dennis romano

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When you open up the plywood, check to see how the joists are attached to the rim joists(if any). If the contractor used joist hangers, you are good. If he just used screws or nails, as long as they are proper(not drywall screws!) it should be ok. What you can do is put in stiffeners perpendicular to the joists. Screw through the joist on each side of the stiffener. This will basically tie the joists together.
 

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